Psychology & Psychiatry

Depression speeds up brain aging, find psychologists

Psychologists at the University of Sussex have found a link between depression and an acceleration of the rate at which the brain ages. Although scientists have previously reported that people with depression or anxiety have ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Neural link between depression and bad sleep identified

The neural link between depression and sleep problems has been identified for the first time in a new study by researchers at the University of Warwick (UK) and Fudan University (China).

Neuroscience

Psychedelic drugs promote neural plasticity in rats and flies

Psychedelic drugs may have mind-altering powers in the physical sense, too. A new study, published June 12 in the journal Cell Reports, found psychedelics, specifically DOI, DMT, and LSD, can change brain cells in rats and ...

Neuroscience

CRISPR technology targets mood-boosting receptors in brain

An estimated 13 percent of Americans take antidepressant drugs for depression, anxiety, chronic pain or sleep problems. For the 14 million Americans who have clinical depression, roughly one third don't find relief with antidepressants.

page 1 from 23

Depression (mood)

In the fields of psychology and psychiatry, the terms depression or depressed refer to sadness and other related emotions and behaviors. It can be thought of as either a disease or a syndrome.

The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) states that a depressed mood is often reported as feeling sad, helpless, and hopeless. In traditional colloquy, "depressed" is often synonymous with "sad," but both clinical depression and non-clinical depression can also refer to a conglomeration of more than one feeling.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA