Psychology & Psychiatry

Live better with attainable goals

Those who set realistic goals can hope for a higher level of well-being. The key for later satisfaction is whether their life goals are seen as attainable and what they mean to the person, as psychologists from the University ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Psychology's diversity problem

Lack of diversity in psychological research is a serious problem that needs to be addressed, according to an Australian academic.

Psychology & Psychiatry

Developmental psychology: Little strategists

Sharing with others and getting something back: Preschoolers expect someone who has benefitted from their generosity to reciprocate when an opportunity arises to do so.

Neuroscience

Deciphering the role of brain layers

New research from the Department of Developmental Neurobiology at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King's College London, sheds light into the role of layers in the brain. The study, published today ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Learning categorical information gives children a feeling of deja vu

During development, children must learn both broad facts about the world (that dogs have four legs, for example) and information that is more specific (that the family dog is scared of snow). While research in developmental ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Emotion knowledge fosters attentiveness

Young children, who possess a good understanding of their own emotions and of those of their fellow human beings early on, suffer fewer attention problems than their peers with a lower emotional understanding. Evidence of ...

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Developmental psychology

'Developmental psychology', also known as human development, is the scientific study of systematic psychological changes that occur in human beings over the course of the life span. Originally concerned with infants and children, the field has expanded to include adolescence and adult development, aging, and the entire life span. This field examines change across a broad range of topics including motor skills and other psycho-physiological processes; cognitive development involving areas such as problem solving, moral understanding, and conceptual understanding; language acquisition; social, personality, and emotional development; and self-concept and identity formation.

Developmental psychology includes issues such as the extent to which development occurs through the gradual accumulation of knowledge versus stage-like development, or the extent to which children are born with innate mental structures versus learning through experience. Many researchers are interested in the interaction between personal characteristics, the individual's behavior, and environmental factors including social context, and their impact on development; others take a more narrowly focused approach.

Developmental psychology informs several applied fields, including: educational psychology, child psychopathology, and forensic developmental psychology. Developmental psychology complements several other basic research fields in psychology including social psychology, cognitive psychology, ecological psychology, and comparative psychology.

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