Health

Is sparkling water bad for you?

For many people, the start of a year is a time for new health resolutions—be it eat more vegetables, consume less sugar or drink more water.

Health

Tips for exercising outdoors in winter

Frigid temperatures can discourage even the most motivated exercisers. Without motivation, it's easy to pack away your workout gear for the winter. But you don't have to let cold weather spell the end of your fitness routine. ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

1971 to 2017 saw 32 drinking water hepatitis A outbreaks

(HealthDay)—Thirty-two outbreaks of hepatitis A associated with drinking water were identified during 1971 to 2017, and all occurred before 2010, according to research published in the Sept. 6 issue of the U.S. Centers ...

Health

Fetching water increases risk of childhood death

Water fetching is associated with poor health outcomes for women and children, including a higher risk of death—according to new research from the University of East Anglia.

Health

Poor water quality linked to sugar drink consumption

Consumption of sugary drinks is common among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander infants and toddlers, and it could be down to water quality, according to a study from The Australian National University (ANU).

Dentistry

How often should I get my teeth cleaned?

If you went to your dentist for a check-up and dental clean in the last year, give yourself a pat on the back. Not everyone loves the dentist, but research shows people who visit at least once a year for preventative care ...

page 1 from 19

Drinking water

Drinking water is water of sufficiently high quality that it can be consumed or used without risk of immediate or long term harm. Such water is commonly called potable water. In most developed countries, the water supplied to households, commerce and industry is all of drinking water standard, even though only a very small proportion (often 5% or less) is actually consumed or used in food preparation.[citation needed]

Over large parts of the world, humans have inadequate access to potable water and use sources contaminated with disease vectors, pathogens or unacceptable levels of dissolved chemicals or suspended solids. Such water is not potable and drinking or using such water in food preparation leads to widespread acute and chronic illness and is a major cause of death in many countries.

Typically, water supply networks deliver potable water, whether it is to be used for drinking, washing or landscape irrigation. One counterexample is urban China, where drinking water can optionally be delivered by a separate tap.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA