Health

How do I tell if I'm dehydrated?

It's a message that's been drummed into us since childhood. Drink water, especially when it's hot, otherwise you'll get dehydrated.

Health

Is all well with your drinking water?

(HealthDay)—More than 15 million homes in the United States get their water from private wells, according to federal estimates.

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Mysterious kidney disease on the rise in South Asia

It was an enigma when it was discovered in the early 1990s. And despite the efforts of scientists in fields from hydrology to medicine, it largely remains so.

Diabetes

Natural sugar defends against metabolic syndrome, in mice

New research, in mice, indicates that a natural sugar called trehalose blocks glucose from the liver and activates a gene that boosts insulin sensitivity, reducing the chance of developing diabetes. Activating the gene also ...

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Drinking water

Drinking water is water of sufficiently high quality that it can be consumed or used without risk of immediate or long term harm. Such water is commonly called potable water. In most developed countries, the water supplied to households, commerce and industry is all of drinking water standard, even though only a very small proportion (often 5% or less) is actually consumed or used in food preparation.[citation needed]

Over large parts of the world, humans have inadequate access to potable water and use sources contaminated with disease vectors, pathogens or unacceptable levels of dissolved chemicals or suspended solids. Such water is not potable and drinking or using such water in food preparation leads to widespread acute and chronic illness and is a major cause of death in many countries.

Typically, water supply networks deliver potable water, whether it is to be used for drinking, washing or landscape irrigation. One counterexample is urban China, where drinking water can optionally be delivered by a separate tap.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA