Obstetrics & gynaecology

Drinking water nitrate risks for babies assessed

There's no conclusive evidence that nitrate in drinking water causes adverse birth outcomes such as preterm birth or birth defects, according to a review for the government by the Liggins Institute at the University of Auckland.

Sports medicine & Kinesiology

Which sports drinks are best for hydration?

Hypotonic drinks ingested during exercise hydrate better than isotonic, hypertonic, and water-based sports drinks, according to new research led by a team from Massey University.

Health

Education essential for eating well on the night shift

In Australia, one in every five employees are shift workers. But when you work irregular hours, you eat at irregular hours and this can put you at increased risk of weight gain, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease.

Health

Unlabeled PFAS chemicals detected in makeup

Makeup wearers may be absorbing and ingesting potentially toxic per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS), according to a new study published today in Environmental Science & Technology Letters. The researchers found high ...

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Drinking water

Drinking water is water of sufficiently high quality that it can be consumed or used without risk of immediate or long term harm. Such water is commonly called potable water. In most developed countries, the water supplied to households, commerce and industry is all of drinking water standard, even though only a very small proportion (often 5% or less) is actually consumed or used in food preparation.[citation needed]

Over large parts of the world, humans have inadequate access to potable water and use sources contaminated with disease vectors, pathogens or unacceptable levels of dissolved chemicals or suspended solids. Such water is not potable and drinking or using such water in food preparation leads to widespread acute and chronic illness and is a major cause of death in many countries.

Typically, water supply networks deliver potable water, whether it is to be used for drinking, washing or landscape irrigation. One counterexample is urban China, where drinking water can optionally be delivered by a separate tap.

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