Oncology & Cancer

Researchers identify key factors impacting adaptive cancer therapy

Most cancer treatments are based on using the maximum tolerated dose of a drug to kill as many cancer cells as possible. While this approach has led to patients achieving good responses to therapy, most patients develop drug ...

Medications

Antibiotic use in Uganda is high

Even before the COVID crisis, excessive use and misuse of lifesaving antibiotics had contributed to the emergence of resistant strains of disease-causing organisms. This has rendered many of the most powerful treatments in ...

Medical research

Scientists closer to outsmarting malaria parasites

Researchers from The Australian National University (ANU) have discovered why malaria parasites are vulnerable to some drug therapies but resistant to others, offering scientists another piece of the puzzle in the global ...

page 1 from 40

Drug resistance

Drug resistance is the reduction in effectiveness of a drug in curing a disease or improving a patient's symptoms. When the drug is not intended to kill or inhibit a pathogen, then the term is equivalent to dosage failure or drug tolerance. More commonly, the term is used in the context of diseases caused by pathogens.

Pathogens are said to be drug-resistant when drugs meant to neutralize them have reduced effect. When an organism is resistant to more than one drug, it is said to be multidrug resistant.

Drug resistance is an example of evolution in microorganisms. Individuals that are not susceptible to the drug effects are capable of surviving drug treatment, and therefore have greater fitness than susceptible individuals. By the process of natural selection, drug resistant traits are selected for in subsequent offspring, resulting in a population that is drug resistant.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA