Other

Record number of patients take part in clinical research

Over 870,000 participants involved in health and social care research across England—a huge increase. The number of new life sciences studies supported by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) the highest yet.

Health

If you're not sleeping at work, you should be fired

In days gone by, when our economy was dominated by agriculture and manufacturing, an employee's value was gauged by their inputs. If they slacked off by not placing a bumper on a car fast enough they were unproductive, and ...

Overweight & Obesity

Fighting obesity—could it be as plain as dirt?

It costs the global economy an estimated US$2 trillion annually and has been dubbed a modern day health epidemic, but new research from the University of South Australia has unearthed a possible cure for obesity—and it ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

The benefits and pitfalls of working in isolation

In October a researcher at the remote Bellingshausen Station in Antarctica allegedly stabbed a colleague. Some reports attributed the incident to the victim giving away the endings of books the attacker was reading.

Health

Five ways to deal with burnout using lessons from elite sport

It is estimated that burnout costs the global economy £255 billion a year. Burnout tends to happen as a result of long-term stress in a situation or job that, for whatever reason, you're highly committed to. So the more ...

Health

Shanghai expands public smoking ban

Shanghai widened its ban on public smoking Wednesday as China's biggest city steps up efforts to stub out the massive health threat despite conflicts of interest with the state-owned tobacco industry.

Health

Study tackles public health in Bangladesh using GIS tools

Geospatial information sciences (GIS) can help determine where diseases are spreading and where to target the resources needed to stop them, but spatial data isn't widely used for health decision-making in many developing ...

page 1 from 7

Economy

An economy (or "the economy") is the realized economic system of a country or other area. It includes the production, exchange, distribution, and consumption of goods and services of that area. The study of different types and examples of economies is the subject of economic systems. A given economy is the end result of a process that involves its technological evolution, history and social organization, as well as its geography, natural resource endowment, and ecology, among other factors. These factors give context, content, and set the conditions and parameters in which an economy functions.

Today the range of fields of study exploring, registering and describing the economy or a part of it, include social sciences such as economics, as well as branches of history (economic history) or geography (economic geography). Practical fields directly related to the human activities involving production, distribution, exchange, and consumption of goods and services as a whole, range from engineering to management and business administration to applied science to finance. All kind of professions, occupations, economic agents or economic activities, contribute to the economy. Consumption, saving and investment are core variable components in the economy and determine market equilibrium. There are three main sectors of economic activity: primary, secondary and tertiary.

The word "economy" can be traced back to the Greek word "one who manages a household", derived from οἴκος, "house", and νέμω, "distribute (especially, manage)". From οἰκονόμος "of a household or family" but also senses such as "thrift", "direction", "administration", "arrangement", and "public revenue of a state". The first recorded sense of the word "economy", found in a work possibly composed in 1440, is "the management of economic affairs", in this case, of a monastery. Economy is later recorded in other senses shared by οἰκονομία in Greek, including "thrift" and "administration". The most frequently used current sense, "the economic system of a country or an area", seems not to have developed until the 19th or 20th century.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA