Ophthalmology

Allowing blind people to see again with a wireless implant

Being able to see without eyes sounds like a miracle, but in the not-too-distant future, a new brain chip could allow the blind and visually impaired to perceive images again. Ph.D. student Adedayo Omisakin worked on wireless ...

Neuroscience

Limiting energy in neurons exacerbates epilepsy

Epilepsy, one of the most common neurological disorders, is characterized by the spontaneous repetition of seizures caused by the hyperactivity of a group of neurons in the brain. Could we therefore reduce neuronal hyperactivity, ...

Neuroscience

Novel study aims to help kids with severe epilepsy

New research from the University of South Australia could deliver a breakthrough for children suffering one of the most severe forms of genetic epilepsy, reducing the frequency of their seizures and improving their quality ...

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Seizure

An epileptic seizure is a transient symptom of excessive or synchronous neuronal activity in the brain. It can manifest as an alteration in mental state, tonic or clonic movements, convulsions, and various other psychic symptoms (such as déjà vu or jamais vu). The medical syndrome of recurrent, unprovoked seizures is termed epilepsy, but seizures can occur in people who do not have epilepsy.

About 4% of people will have an unprovoked seizure by the age of 80 and only 30% to 40% or according to another study 50% chance of a second one. Treatment may reduce the chance of a second one by as much as half.

The treatment of epilepsy is a subspecialty of neurology; the study of seizures is part of neuroscience. Doctors who specialize in epilepsy are epileptologists; doctors who specialize in the treatment of children with epilepsy are pediatric epileptologists.

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