Genetics

Links to genetic disorders found in walking patterns

Rutgers researchers have linked the genetic disorders Fragile X and SHANK3 deletion syndrome—both linked to autism and health problems—to walking patterns by examining the microscopic movements of those wearing motion-sensored ...

Neuroscience

Novel computational model to predict 'change blindness'

Our brains have the remarkable ability to process details, but may sometimes fail to notice even marked differences. For example, in the images above, some people may not immediately spot the difference in size between the ...

Ophthalmology

A new protein treatment for glaucoma?

A Northwestern Medicine study in mice has identified new treatment targets for glaucoma, including preventing a severe pediatric form of glaucoma, as well as uncovering a possible new class of therapy for the most common ...

Health

Evidence links the carotenoid lutein with eye health

Although the carotenoid lutein and its related form called zeaxanthin have been associated with eye health for some time, the amount that provides benefit has yet to be quantified.

page 1 from 40

Eye

Eyes are organs that detect light, and send signals along the optic nerve to the visual and other areas of the brain[citation needed]. Complex optical systems with resolving power have come in ten fundamentally different forms, and 96% of animal species possess a complex optical system. Image-resolving eyes are present in cnidaria, molluscs, chordates, annelids and arthropods.

The simplest "eyes", such as those in unicellular organisms, do nothing but detect whether the surroundings are light or dark, which is sufficient for the entrainment of circadian rhythms. From more complex eyes, retinal photosensitive ganglion cells send signals along the retinohypothalamic tract to the suprachiasmatic nuclei to effect circadian adjustment.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA