Immunology

Immune cells regulate body weight

Obesity is among the biggest health challenges of the 21st century, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). Almost 60% of Germans are considered overweight, while 25% are obese. Moreover, being overweight often ...

Overweight & Obesity

Furthering fat loss in the fasting response

The coming of spring harkens spring cleaning; a time to de-clutter your home and discard things that are no longer needed. In the body, a cellular process calledautophagy occurs regularly to "de-clutter" our cells. Recently, ...

Overweight & Obesity

Connecting stress, weight, and social anxiety in early adolescence

Between the end of childhood and the beginning of adolescence, there is a critical window of time referred to as "peripuberty." This transitional period involves developmental changes in both fat tissue and in the brain in ...

Overweight & Obesity

Well-functioning fat may be the key to fewer old-age ailments

Fat tissue plays an important role in human health. However, our fat tissue loses function as we age, which can lead to type 2 diabetes, obesity, cancer and other ailments. High levels of lifelong exercise seem to counteract ...

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Adipose tissue

In histology, adipose tissue or body fat or just fat is loose connective tissue composed of adipocytes. Adipose tissue is derived from lipoblasts. Its main role is to store energy in the form of fat, although it also cushions and insulates the body. Obesity or being overweight in humans and most animals does not depend on body weight but on the amount of body fat—specifically, adipose tissue. Two types of adipose tissue exist: white adipose tissue (WAT) and brown adipose tissue (BAT). Adipose tissue also serves as an important endocrine organ by producing hormones such as leptin, resistin and the cytokine TNFα. The formation of adipose tissue appears to be controlled by the adipose gene. Adipose tissue was first identified by the Swiss naturalist Conrad Gessner in 1551.\

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