Oncology & Cancer

New analysis addresses fear of cancer recurrence

After undergoing treatment for cancer, patients may worry that the disease will recur. An analysis of published studies indicates that fear of cancer recurrence may lead to an increased use of healthcare resources—such ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Anxiety in a post-COVID world

A post-pandemic world is arguably near. Experts anticipate a "return to normal," or the next iteration of normal, in 2022. Many people correlate the end of mask-wearing with the end of the pandemic, or see herd immunity as ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Mexico's indirect COVID-19 deaths may be over 120,000

Many of the over 120,000 excess deaths Mexico suffered so far during the pandemic may have been indirectly caused by the coronavirus, even if those people didn't die of COVID-19, Mexican officials said Tuesday.

Psychology & Psychiatry

Screams of 'joy' sound like 'fear' when heard out of context

People are adept at discerning most of the different emotions that underlie screams, such as anger, frustration, pain, surprise or fear, finds a new study by psychologists at Emory University. Screams of happiness, however, ...

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Fear

Fear is an emotional response to threats and danger. It is a basic survival mechanism occurring in response to a specific stimulus, such as pain or the threat of pain. Psychologists John B. Watson, Robert Plutchik, and Paul Ekman have suggested that fear is one of a small set of basic or innate emotions. This set also includes such emotions as joy, sadness, and anger. Fear should be distinguished from the related emotional state of anxiety, which typically occurs without any external threat. Additionally, fear is related to the specific behaviors of escape and avoidance, whereas anxiety is the result of threats which are perceived to be uncontrollable or unavoidable. Worth noting is that fear always relates to future events, such as worsening of a situation, or continuation of a situation that is unacceptable.

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