Neuroscience

The overlap between fear and anxiety brain circuits

Fear and anxiety reflect overlapping brain circuits, according to research recently published in JNeurosci. The findings highlight a need to reevaluate the existing models guiding anxiety research.

Psychology & Psychiatry

How fear persists in the mouse brain

Most people have experienced, at some point in their lives, a sudden unexpected fright. Even after a shadowy figure in a darkened room turns out to just be a chair, your heart rate is still high, your palms stay sweaty, and ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Pregnant women's psychological health during the COVID-19 outbreak

A recent study that examined the psychological health of pregnant women during the COVID-19 outbreak uncovered fear and depression in many participants. The findings are published in the Journal of Clinical Nursing.

Pediatrics

Mayo Clinic Q&A: Your child's storm anxiety

DEAR MAYO CLINIC: I have a 7-year-old daughter who becomes anxious and agitated whenever it storms. What can I do to help her overcome her fear of thunderstorms and tornadoes? She's always asking about the weather whenever ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Pandemic leads to higher depression, anxiety and fear, studies show

The COVID-19 pandemic led to higher levels of depression, anxiety, suicidal tendencies and psychological trauma among American adults during the early months of its spread, according to three new studies published by University ...

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Fear

Fear is an emotional response to threats and danger. It is a basic survival mechanism occurring in response to a specific stimulus, such as pain or the threat of pain. Psychologists John B. Watson, Robert Plutchik, and Paul Ekman have suggested that fear is one of a small set of basic or innate emotions. This set also includes such emotions as joy, sadness, and anger. Fear should be distinguished from the related emotional state of anxiety, which typically occurs without any external threat. Additionally, fear is related to the specific behaviors of escape and avoidance, whereas anxiety is the result of threats which are perceived to be uncontrollable or unavoidable. Worth noting is that fear always relates to future events, such as worsening of a situation, or continuation of a situation that is unacceptable.

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