Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Early dengue virus infection could 'defuse' Zika virus

"We now know for sure that Zika virus infection during pregnancy can affect the unborn foetus in such a way that the child develops microcephaly and other severe symptoms," explains Prof Felix Drexler, a virologist at Charité ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Q&A: Malaria continues to be a significant travel-related disease

Dear Mayo Clinic: I'm planning a three-week trip to Tanzania. My doctor recommends that I take medication to prevent malaria. Is this really necessary? I thought malaria wasn't common anymore. Are there other things that ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

US approves dengue vaccine Dengvaxia

US health authorities have given their approval to dengue vaccine Dengvaxia, the controversial first treatment designed to protect against the deadly mosquito-borne virus.

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Congo's president wants Ebola contained within 3 months

Congo's president on Tuesday said he wants to see a deadly Ebola virus outbreak contained in less than three months even as some health experts say it could take twice as long.

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Kids can get UTIs, too

(HealthDay)—Adults aren't the only ones susceptible to urinary tract infections, or UTIs. They can occur in kids, even infants, if bacteria get into the urinary tract, often from the bowel.

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Fever

Fever (also known as pyrexia) is a common medical sign characterized by an elevation of temperature above the normal range of 36.5–37.5 °C (98–100 °F) due to an increase in the body temperature regulatory set-point. This increase in set-point triggers increased muscle tone and shivering.

As a person's temperature increases, there is, in general, a feeling of cold despite an increasing body temperature. Once the new temperature is reached, there is a feeling of warmth. A fever can be caused by many different conditions ranging from benign to potentially serious. There are arguments for and against the usefulness of fever, and the issue is controversial. With the exception of very high temperatures, treatment to reduce fever is often not necessary; however, antipyretic medications can be effective at lowering the temperature, which may improve the affected person's comfort.

Fever differs from uncontrolled hyperthermia, in that hyperthermia is an increase in body temperature over the body's thermoregulatory set-point, due to excessive heat production and/or insufficient thermoregulation.

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