Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Some viruses make you smell tastier to mosquitoes

Zika and dengue fever viruses alter the scent of mice and humans they infect, researchers report in the 30 June issue of Cell. The altered scent attracts mosquitoes, which bite the host, drink their infected blood and then ...

Health

What do you know about headaches?

June is Migraine and Headache Awareness Month, which makes this a good time to learn more about headaches.

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

South Africa records first case of monkeypox

South Africa on Thursday reported its first case of monkeypox, joining some 40 other countries that have identified patients with the disease.

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

South Korea reports first imported case of monkeypox

South Korea reported its first imported cases of monkeypox Wednesday, becoming the latest of some 40 countries—and the first in East Asia—to have identified the disease.

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

WHO drops endemic country distinction for monkeypox

The World Health Organization says it has removed the distinction between endemic and non-endemic countries in its data on monkeypox to better unify the response to the virus.

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Iraq's Congo fever death toll rises to 27: ministry

Iraq's death toll from tick-borne Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever has increased to 27 this year, according to the latest figures released Saturday by authorities struggling to contain an outbreak.

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Fever

Fever (also known as pyrexia) is a common medical sign characterized by an elevation of temperature above the normal range of 36.5–37.5 °C (98–100 °F) due to an increase in the body temperature regulatory set-point. This increase in set-point triggers increased muscle tone and shivering.

As a person's temperature increases, there is, in general, a feeling of cold despite an increasing body temperature. Once the new temperature is reached, there is a feeling of warmth. A fever can be caused by many different conditions ranging from benign to potentially serious. There are arguments for and against the usefulness of fever, and the issue is controversial. With the exception of very high temperatures, treatment to reduce fever is often not necessary; however, antipyretic medications can be effective at lowering the temperature, which may improve the affected person's comfort.

Fever differs from uncontrolled hyperthermia, in that hyperthermia is an increase in body temperature over the body's thermoregulatory set-point, due to excessive heat production and/or insufficient thermoregulation.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA