Immunology

Cracks in the skin of eczema patients promote allergic diseases

Infants who develop eczema are more likely to develop food allergies, hay fever and asthma as they grow older, a progression known as the atopic march. Donald Leung, MD, Ph.D., head of Pediatric Allergy & Clinical Immunology ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Scientists uncover mechanism behind development of viral infections

A team of researchers from the SingHealth Duke-NUS Academic Medicine Centre's Viral Research and Experimental Medicine Centre (ViREMiCS) found that immune cells undergoing stress and an altered metabolism are the reasons ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

A near-fatal Valley Fever case opens doors to new treatment method

Of the 8,000 Californians who will contract Valley Fever this year, most will recover without treatment, and those with more serious cases will require an antifungal medication that clears the infection. But a few will experience ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Dengue infection: A shield against Zika-related birth defects

The Zika virus outbreak in Latin America less than 5 years ago had severe consequences for expectant mothers. Many who were infected with the Zika virus gave birth to children with microcephaly and other birth defects, collectively ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

It's mosquito season: here's how to protect yourself

(HealthDay)—Summer is synonymous with mosquitoes, and that means possible exposure to the West Nile and Zika viruses. Both are spread mainly through mosquito bites.

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Heading to Europe this summer? Get your measles shot

(HealthDay)—As Europe deals with its biggest measles outbreaks since the 1990s, U.S. health officials are urging travelers to be up-to-date on vaccination.

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Uganda confirms first Ebola case outside outbreak in Congo

A child in Uganda has tested positive for Ebola in the first cross-border case of the deadly virus since an outbreak started in neighboring Congo last year, Uganda's health ministry said late Tuesday, in a blow to efforts ...

page 1 from 23

Fever

Fever (also known as pyrexia) is a common medical sign characterized by an elevation of temperature above the normal range of 36.5–37.5 °C (98–100 °F) due to an increase in the body temperature regulatory set-point. This increase in set-point triggers increased muscle tone and shivering.

As a person's temperature increases, there is, in general, a feeling of cold despite an increasing body temperature. Once the new temperature is reached, there is a feeling of warmth. A fever can be caused by many different conditions ranging from benign to potentially serious. There are arguments for and against the usefulness of fever, and the issue is controversial. With the exception of very high temperatures, treatment to reduce fever is often not necessary; however, antipyretic medications can be effective at lowering the temperature, which may improve the affected person's comfort.

Fever differs from uncontrolled hyperthermia, in that hyperthermia is an increase in body temperature over the body's thermoregulatory set-point, due to excessive heat production and/or insufficient thermoregulation.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA