Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

COVID-19: Flattening the curve

Media coverage of COVID-19 often includes the phrase "flattening the curve." Dr. Clayton Cowl, chair of Mayo Clinic's Division of Preventive, Occupational and Aerospace Medicine, says the phrase refers to an attempt to stop ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Coronavirus: How behaviour can help control the spread of COVID-19

Amid the carnage of the First World War, a flu epidemic took hold in the front-line trenches and subsequently spread around the world, infecting one-quarter of the world's total population and ultimately killing more people ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

China's recent history of deadly epidemics

China has been the origin of several major viral epidemics over recent decades, with the current outbreak of a new deadly coronavirus emerging in the central city of Wuhan.

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

WHO launches strategy to fight 'inevitable' flu pandemics

The World Health Organization on Monday launched a strategy to protect people worldwide over the next decade against the threat of influenza, warning that new pandemics are "inevitable".

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

'Killer' cells raise hope of universal flu vaccine

Scientists said Monday they had discovered immune cells that can fight all known flu viruses in what was hailed as an "extraordinary breakthrough" that could lead to a universal, one-shot vaccine against the killer disease.

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Why historians ignored the Spanish flu

To judge by the popularity of films like World War Z, pandemics are in vogue and none more so than the Spanish influenza of 1918-19. To mark the centenary of the pandemic this autumn, the BBC has commissioned Spanish Flu: ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Spanish flu: more deadly than World War I

The Spanish flu outbreak 100 years ago is the modern world's deadliest epidemic, its toll of more than 50 million surpassing that of World War I.

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Here's why the 2017 flu season was so bad

Australia has recorded 221,853 flu infections so far in 2017, more than any other year. As the flu season comes to an end, we're beginning to understand why it was so bad. And it wasn't because of increased, or more sensitive, ...

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