Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Common antidepressant may reduce deadly COVID-19 complications

As mental health professionals are grappling with a wave of pandemic-related anxiety and depression, a physician-researcher at The University of Toledo College of Medicine and Life Sciences is studying whether a commonly ...

Medications

Antidepressant does not improve post-stroke recovery

The antidepressant fluoxetine has been suggested as a means to improve brain recovery after acute stroke. However, a large randomized study on stroke patients at 35 Swedish hospitals shows that the drug has no such effect. ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Depression in adults who are overweight or obese

In an analysis of primary care records of 519,513 UK adults who were overweight or obese between 2000-2016 and followed up until 2019, the incidence of new cases of depression was 92 per 10,000 people per year. The risk of ...

Neuroscience

How a popular antidepressant drug could rewire the brain

Prozac, the trade name for the drug fluoxetine, was introduced to the U.S. market for the treatment of depression in 1988. Thirty years later, scientists still don't know exactly how the medication exerts its mood-lifting ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

The far-reaching effects of antidepressants

When University of Ottawa biologists Marilyn Vera-Chang and Vance Trudeau began to study the effects of a popular antidepressant on reproduction levels in zebrafish, they stumbled across something that changed the course ...

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Fluoxetine

Fluoxetine (also known by the tradenames Prozac, Sarafem, Fontex) is an antidepressant of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) class. It is manufactured and marketed by Eli Lilly and Company. In combination with olanzapine it is known as Symbyax.

Fluoxetine is approved for the treatment of major depression (including pediatric depression), obsessive-compulsive disorder (in both adult and pediatric populations), bulimia nervosa, panic disorder and premenstrual dysphoric disorder.

Despite the availability of newer agents, fluoxetine remains extremely popular. In 2010, over 24.4 million prescriptions for generic formulations of fluoxetine were filled in the United States alone, making it the third most prescribed antidepressant after sertraline (SSRI; became generic in 2006) and citalopram (SSRI; became generic in 2003) in that country.

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