Psychology & Psychiatry

Brain activity may help predict success of CBT in depression

In a new study, led by the University of Glasgow and published in Science Advances, scientists show that brain activity recorded using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) may help predict response to CBT in depression ...

Neuroscience

Big data clarifies emotional circuit development

Several brain circuits that identify emotions are solidified early in development and include diverse regions beyond the amygdala, according to new research in children, adolescents, and young adults published in JNeurosci.

Neuroscience

Pigs help scientists understand human brain

For the first time, researchers in the University of Georgia's Regenerative Bioscience Center have used an imaging method normally reserved for humans to analyze brain activity in live agricultural swine models, and they ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Altered brain activity in antisocial teenagers

Teenage girls with problematic social behavior display reduced brain activity and weaker connectivity between the brain regions implicated in emotion regulation. The findings of an international study carried out by researchers ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Exploring the science of decision-making

In a world that offers a seemingly unending number of options and opportunities, people may rely on the overall complexity of alternative options to help them make choices in uncertain environments, according to researchers.

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Functional magnetic resonance imaging

Functional MRI or functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) is a type of specialized MRI scan. It measures the haemodynamic response related to neural activity in the brain or spinal cord of humans or other animals. It is one of the most recently developed forms of neuroimaging. Since the early 1990s, fMRI has come to dominate the brain mapping field due to its low invasiveness, lack of radiation exposure, and relatively wide availability.

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