Psychology & Psychiatry

Get your game face on: Study finds it may help

At the 2016 Rio Olympics, Michael Phelps was caught on camera glaring as he prepared for the men's 200-meter butterfly final. The look, popularly known as Phelps face, became an example of a concept that has long been familiar ...

Health

A workout to protect your thumbs

The range of motion of the human thumb makes so many everyday hand movements possible. Whether you're an athlete gripping sports equipment, a baker whisking egg whites or a do-it-yourselfer hammering a nail, you'd be at a ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Nothing clinically 'wrong' with obsessive gamers, new study finds

Research by Oxford University, carried out in partnership with Cardiff University, and published today in Clinical Psychological Science, has found little evidence to suggest an unhealthy passion for gaming amongst adolescents, ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Tetris gameplay reveals complex cognitive skills

In a fraction of a second, a colorful digital block shaped like the letter "L" falls from the top of the computer screen. In even less time, fingers float across a controller, striking the arrow keys in rapid succession to ...

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Game

A game is a structured activity, usually undertaken for enjoyment and sometimes used as an educational tool. Games are distinct from work, which is usually carried out for remuneration, and from art, which is more concerned with the expression of ideas. However, the distinction is not clear-cut, and many games are also considered to be work (such as professional players of spectator sports/games) or art (such as jigsaw puzzles or games involving an artistic layout such as Mah-jongg solitaire).

Key components of games are goals, rules, challenge, and interaction. Games generally involve mental or physical stimulation, and often both. Many games help develop practical skills, serve as a form of exercise, or otherwise perform an educational, simulational or psychological role. According to Chris Crawford, the requirement for player interaction puts activities such as jigsaw puzzles and solitaire "games" into the category of puzzles rather than games.

Attested as early as 2600 BC, games are a universal part of human experience and present in all cultures. The Royal Game of Ur, Senet, and Mancala are some of the oldest known games.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA