Health

Wearing hearing aid may help protect brain in later life

A new study has concluded that people who wear a hearing aid for age-related hearing problems maintain better brain function over time than those who do not. It builds on important research in recent years pulled together ...

Alzheimer's disease & dementia

Loss of multiple senses increases dementia risk

Two studies presented at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference 2019 have explored whether losing multiple senses, including hearing and sight, increases the risk of dementia.

Neuroscience

How noise and age affect brain's sound processing

Hearing loss is so common in today's society, especially in older individuals, that many people question the use of doing anything to protect their hearing from noise and loud sounds. But it turns out the source of hearing ...

Health

Don't let fireworks deafen you

(HealthDay)—Fireworks are a beautiful sight to behold, but they can damage your hearing if you're not careful.

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Testing newborn saliva for virus linked to hearing loss

Victorian newborns who do not pass their routine hearing screening tests are being invited to join a pilot program screening for the most common viral cause of disability.

Medical research

Drug to treat malaria could mitigate hereditary hearing loss

The ability to hear depends on proteins to reach the outer membrane of sensory cells in the inner ear. But in certain types of hereditary hearing loss, mutations in the protein prevent it from reaching these membranes. Using ...

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Hearing impairment

A hearing impairment or deafness is a full or partial decrease in the ability to detect or understand sounds. Caused by a wide range of biological and environmental factors, loss of hearing can happen to any organism that perceives sound. "Hearing impaired" is often used to refer to those who are deaf, although the term is viewed negatively by members of Deaf culture, who prefer the terms "Deaf" and "Hard of Hearing".

Sound waves vary in amplitude and in frequency. Amplitude is the sound wave's peak pressure variation. Frequency is the number of cycles per second of a sinusoidal component of a sound wave. Loss of the ability to detect some frequencies, or to detect low-amplitude sounds that an organism naturally detects, is a hearing impairment.

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