Alzheimer's disease & dementia

Dementia prevention strategies could save £1.9 billion annually

Programs to reduce dementia risk by targeting smoking, high blood pressure and hearing loss are likely to be cost-effective and cost saving by reducing dementia rates by 8.5%, finds a new study by UCL and LSE researchers.

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Lockdown could worsen hearing woes for U.S. seniors

(HealthDay)—Isolation due to the pandemic and failure to get hearing aids checked has fueled anxiety, depression and more hearing loss for many seniors.

Genetics

New genes for human deafness found in Israeli families

Until now, seven genes were known to be involved in hearing loss in Israel's Jewish population. A new study led by Zippora Brownstein, Ph.D., and Prof. Karen Avraham from the Sackler Faculty of Medicine at Tel Aviv University ...

Gerontology & Geriatrics

USPSTF: Evidence lacking for screening elders for hearing loss

(HealthDay)—The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) concludes that current evidence is inadequate for assessing the balance of benefits and harms of hearing loss screening for older adults. This finding forms the ...

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Hearing impairment

A hearing impairment or deafness is a full or partial decrease in the ability to detect or understand sounds. Caused by a wide range of biological and environmental factors, loss of hearing can happen to any organism that perceives sound. "Hearing impaired" is often used to refer to those who are deaf, although the term is viewed negatively by members of Deaf culture, who prefer the terms "Deaf" and "Hard of Hearing".

Sound waves vary in amplitude and in frequency. Amplitude is the sound wave's peak pressure variation. Frequency is the number of cycles per second of a sinusoidal component of a sound wave. Loss of the ability to detect some frequencies, or to detect low-amplitude sounds that an organism naturally detects, is a hearing impairment.

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