Cardiology

Flipping a molecular switch for heart fibrosis

A healthy heart is a pliable, ever-moving organ. But under stress—from injury, cardiovascular disease, or aging—the heart thickens and stiffens in a process known as fibrosis, which involves diffuse scar-like tissue. ...

Cardiology

Bio-inspired hydrogel protects the heart from post-op adhesions

A hydrogel that forms a barrier to keep heart tissue from adhering to surrounding tissue after surgery was developed and successfully tested in rodents by a team of University of California San Diego researchers. The team ...

Neuroscience

Running to music combats mental fatigue

Listening to music while running might be the key to improving people's performance when they feel mentally fatigued, a new study suggests.

Cardiology

Lowering the cost of heart cell therapies

Suffering from the number one cause of death, patients with heart disease are in desperate need of new therapies. However, these new therapies rely on research using heart cells, which are not easy to access. In response, ...

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Heart

The heart is a muscular organ in all vertebrates responsible for pumping blood through the blood vessels by repeated, rhythmic contractions, or a similar structure in annelids, mollusks, and arthropods. The term cardiac (as in cardiology) means "related to the heart" and comes from the Greek καρδιά, kardia, for "heart."

The heart of a vertebrate is composed of cardiac muscle, an involuntary striated muscle tissue which is found only within this organ. The average human heart, beating at 72 beats per minute, will beat approximately 2.5 billion times during a lifetime (about 66 years). It weighs on average 250 g to 300 g in females and 300 g to 350 g in males.

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