Biomedical technology

Blood bubbles reveal oxygen levels

Blood carries vital oxygen through our circulation system to muscles and organs. Acoustic tools can create small bubbles in our blood, capable of changing in response to oxygen and signifying oxygen levels.

Biomedical technology

Wearable device could reduce racial disparities in blood measurements

Bioengineers and scientists at The University of Texas at Arlington, in collaboration with Austin's Shani Biotechnologies, LLC, have developed a new noninvasive technology that may help real-time monitoring of key blood parameters, ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Understanding sickle cell disease

Sickle cell disease, which is a group of inherited red blood cell disorders, affects approximately 100,000 people in the U.S., according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Medical research

Positive preliminary data on CRISPR treatment for blood diseases

A collaborative team of researchers, including Stephan Grupp, MD, Ph.D., Cell Therapy and Transplant Section Chief and Medical Director of the Cell and Gene Therapy Laboratory at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) ...

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Hemoglobin

Hemoglobin (English pronunciation: /hiːməˈɡloʊbɪn/; also rendered as haemoglobin and abbreviated Hb or Hgb) is the iron-containing oxygen-transport metalloprotein in the red blood cells of all vertebrates, with the exception of the fish family Channichthyidae, as well as the tissues of some invertebrates. Hemoglobin in the blood carries oxygen from the respiratory organs (lungs or gills) to the rest of the body (i.e., the tissues) where it releases the oxygen to burn nutrients to provide energy to power the functions of the organism, and collects the resultant carbon dioxide to bring it back to the respiratory organs to be dispensed from the organism.

In mammals, the protein makes up about 97% of the red blood cells' dry content, and around 35% of the total content (including water).[citation needed] Hemoglobin has an oxygen binding capacity of 1.34 ml O2 per gram of hemoglobin, which increases the total blood oxygen capacity seventy-fold compared to dissolved oxygen in blood. The mammalian hemoglobin molecule can bind (carry) up to four oxygen molecules.

Hemoglobin is involved in the transport of other gases: it carries some of the body's respiratory carbon dioxide (about 10% of the total) as carbaminohemoglobin, in which CO2 is bound to the globin protein. The molecule also carries the important regulatory molecule nitric oxide bound to a globin protein thiol group, releasing it at the same time as oxygen.

Hemoglobin is also found outside red blood cells and their progenitor lines. Other cells that contain hemoglobin include the A9 dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra, macrophages, alveolar cells, and mesangial cells in the kidney. In these tissues, hemoglobin has a non-oxygen-carrying function as an antioxidant and a regulator of iron metabolism.

Hemoglobin and hemoglobin-like molecules are also found in many invertebrates, fungi, and plants. In these organisms, hemoglobins may carry oxygen, or they may act to transport and regulate other things such as carbon dioxide, nitric oxide, hydrogen sulfide and sulfide. A variant of the molecule, called leghemoglobin, is used to scavenge oxygen, to keep it from poisoning anaerobic systems, such as nitrogen-fixing nodules of leguminous plants.

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