Neuroscience

Therapeutic cooling effectively targets site of brain injury

When a newborn suffers lack of oxygen before or during birth, doctors have very little time to save precious brain tissue. The only proven effective way to treat babies with hypoxic brain injuries is by reducing body temperature ...

Health

A better way to treat hypothermia

Although most of the western hemisphere is sweating in the summer heat, a team of U of M researchers are keeping cool by finding more efficient ways to tackle hypothermia.

Health

Staying safe in the cold

In extremely cold, snowy and windy conditions, your safest option is to stay indoors. But if you have to head outside, experts at Rush University Medical Center have advice for avoiding the most common cold-related injuries: ...

HIV & AIDS

Layer up during the polar vortex

(HealthDay)— As a giant polar vortex sweeps down over most of the United States, bringing with it temperatures so frigid that frostbite and hypothermia can happen within minutes, doctors have some advice for those who dare ...

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Hypothermia

Hypothermia (from Greek υποθερμία) is a condition in which core temperature drops below the required temperature for normal metabolism and body functions which is defined as 35.0 °C (95.0 °F). Body temperature is usually maintained near a constant level of 36.5–37.5 °C (98–100 °F) through biologic homeostasis or thermoregulation. If exposed to cold and the internal mechanisms are unable to replenish the heat that is being lost, a drop in core temperature occurs. As body temperature decreases, characteristic symptoms occur such as shivering and mental confusion.

Hypothermia is the opposite of hyperthermia which is present in heat exhaustion and heat stroke. One of the lowest documented body temperature from which anyone has recovered was 13.0 °C (55.4 °F), in a drowning incident involving a 7-year-old girl in Sweden in December 2010.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA