Psychology & Psychiatry

Women and men react differently to infidelity

If your partner has sex with someone else, it is considered infidelity - even if no emotions are involved. But it is also considered infidelity when your significant other develops a close personal relationship with someone ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Jealousy and envy at work are different in men and women

A study carried out by researchers from Spain, the Netherlands and Argentina suggests that in a work environment, sexual competition affects women more than men. However, a rival's social skills provoke jealousy and professional ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

What the evolution of jealousy tells us about online infidelity

It is estimated that by 2020, 2.95 billion people will be using social networks. But while sites like Facebook revolve around the wholesome concepts of friends, likes and shares, they have also become a way for people to ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Jealousy can drive us to view ourselves more like our rivals

If you see your partner flirt with someone else, you may feel hurt, angry, and jealous. The last thing you might expect is to start thinking of yourself more like your rival. New research suggests just that: that jealousy ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Sharing food with others can lead to jealousy

When is lunch not just lunch? When someone in a romantic relationship shares a meal with an ex-lover, finds two Cornell studies that looked at jealousy and shared meals. The studies find that people who are part of couples ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Are we still jealous? Infidelity in the age of social media

When men and women find social media messages indicating that their partner has been cheating on them, they show the same type of jealousy behaviour as finding offline evidence that their partner has been unfaithful. This ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Peers and online activities trigger jealousy in adolescents

Adolescents are more likely to experience feelings of jealously when they spend time online or interact with peers, according to research by psychologist Hannah Lennarz at Radboud University. Lennarz will defend her Ph.D. ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

For anxious spouses, a baby may be a rival

A new child can spark feelings of jealousy in a person who already fears being abandoned by his or her partner, research suggests.

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Jealousy

Jealousy is a second emotion[clarification needed] and typically refers to the negative thoughts and feelings of insecurity, fear, and anxiety over an anticipated loss of something that the person values, particularly in reference to a human connection. Jealousy often consists of a combination of presenting emotions such as anger, sadness, resentment and disgust. It is not to be confused with envy.

Jealousy is a familiar experience in human relationships. It has been observed in infants five months and older. Some claim that jealousy is seen in every culture; however, others claim jealousy is a culture-specific phenomenon.

Jealousy is often reinforced as a series of particularly strong emotions and constructed as a universal human experience; it has been a theme of many artistic works that seek to privilege monogamous discourses. Psychologists have proposed several models of the processes underlying jealousy and have identified factors that result in jealousy. Sociologists have demonstrated that cultural beliefs and values play an important role in determining what triggers jealousy and what constitutes socially acceptable expressions of jealousy. Biologists have identified factors that may unconsciously influence the expression of jealousy. Artists have explored the theme of jealousy in photographs, paintings, movies, songs, plays, poems, and books. Theologians have offered religious views of jealousy based on the scriptures of their respective faiths.

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