Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Kidney failure patients face higher risk of cancer death

A new study indicates that individuals with kidney failure, such as those undergoing dialysis and those who have received kidney transplants, experience higher risks of dying from cancer than people in the general population. ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Living donors may benefit transplant patients

For a patient awaiting a new organ—namely a liver or kidney—living donation provides a viable alternative and can often shorten a recipient's wait time.

Alzheimer's disease & dementia

Does intensive blood pressure control reduce dementia?

Intensive lowering of blood pressure did not significantly reduce dementia risk but did have a measurable impact on mild cognitive impairment (MCI), according to the final, peer-reviewed results from the Systolic Blood Pressure ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

New kidney research sheds light on harms of certain drugs

Scientists have identified an enzyme that is a "master regulator" of kidney function that if excessively suppressed, can trigger renal failure. Their findings have implications for the use of existing drugs and the development ...

Diabetes

How to develop personalised diabetes treatment

Diabetes can lead to blindness, kidney failure, heart attack, stroke, lower limb amputation and premature death. It was the seventh leading cause of death in 2016, according to the World Health Organization. The Diabetes ...

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Renal failure

Renal failure or kidney failure is a situation in which the kidneys fail to function adequately. It is divided into acute and chronic forms; either form may be due to a large number of other medical problems.

Biochemically, it is typically detected by an elevated serum creatinine. In the science of physiology, renal failure is described as a decrease in the glomerular filtration rate. When the kidneys malfunction, problems frequently encountered are abnormal fluid levels in the body, deranged acid levels, abnormal levels of potassium, calcium, phosphate, hematuria (blood in the urine) and (in the longer term) anemia. Long-term kidney problems have significant repercussions on other diseases, such as cardiovascular disease.

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