Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Combination therapy treats leishmaniasis, HIV patients

Coinfection with visceral leishmaniasis (VL) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has been observed in at least 35 countries on four continents and requires special case management. Currently, the World Health Organization ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Natural compound 2HF treats leishmaniasis infections, study finds

Current treatment options for the parasitic disease leishmaniasis are largely ineffective, expensive, and tend to be plagued by resistant parasites and side effects. Now, researchers reporting in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Genes key to identifying drug resistant parasites in Brazil

Researchers at the University of York have identified genes in a parasite that could help clinicians predict drug treatment outcomes for patients with visceral leishmaniasis in Brazil.

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

INRS takes aim at dreaded tropical disease leishmaniasis

Leishmania is a microorganism that enters the human body via a sandfly bite. The parasite allows itself to be swallowed up by white blood cells to advance its life cycle. The disease threatens the health of over 500 million ...

Immunology

How chronic infections can outsmart the immune system

Professor Simona Stäger and her team at INRS have discovered a mechanism that causes the body to sabotage its own defenses against infection by visceral leishmaniasis, a fatal tropical disease. This discovery could help ...

page 1 from 6

Leishmaniasis

Leishmaniasis is a disease caused by protozoan parasites that belong to the genus Leishmania and is transmitted by the bite of certain species of sand fly (subfamily Phlebotominae). Although the majority of the literature mentions only one genus transmitting Leishmania to humans (Lutzomyia) in the Americas, a 2003 study by Galati suggested a new classification for the New World sand flies, elevating several subgenera to the genus level. Elsewhere in the world, the genus Phlebotomus is considered the vector of leishmaniasis.

Most forms of the disease are transmissible only from animals (zoonosis), but some can be spread between humans. Human infection is caused by about 21 of 30 species that infect mammals. These include the L. donovani complex with three species (L. donovani, L. infantum, and L. chagasi); the L. mexicana complex with four main species (L. mexicana, L. amazonensis, and L. venezuelensis); L. tropica; L. major; L. aethiopica; and the subgenus Viannia with four main species (L. (V.) braziliensis, L. (V.) guyanensis, L. (V.) panamensis, and L. (V.) peruviana). The different species are morphologically indistinguishable, but they can be differentiated by isoenzyme analysis, DNA sequence analysis, or monoclonal antibodies.

Cutaneous leishmaniasis is the most common form of leishmaniasis. Visceral leishmaniasis is a severe form in which the parasites have migrated to the vital organs.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA