Neuroscience

The brain: How to optimize decision making?

UNIGE researchers demonstrate that our brains do not make decisions based on their inherent value but for what they offer above and beyond other possible propositions.

Cardiology

Polypill holds promise for tackling cardiovascular disease

Heart attacks and strokes are collectively the leading cause of death in most low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) worldwide. Treatment with four drugs—aspirin, a statin, an angiotensin converting-enzyme (ACE)-inhibitor, ...

Neuroscience

Neuroscientists make major breakthrough in 200-year-old puzzle

For centuries, the mental world of the mind and the physical world were treated as utterly distinct. While the movement of inanimate objects could be measured and ultimately predicted with the help of mathematics, the behavior ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Brain activity may help predict success of CBT in depression

In a new study, led by the University of Glasgow and published in Science Advances, scientists show that brain activity recorded using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) may help predict response to CBT in depression ...

Medical research

Sweating a clue into who develops PTSD—and who doesn't

Within four hours of a traumatic experience, certain physiological markers—namely, sweating—are higher in people who go on to develop post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), according to new research from Case Western ...

Medical research

Crunching the numbers of cancer metastasis

In metastasis, cancer cells break away from the original tumor and take root in another region of the body by entering the blood stream. In order to spread, metastatic cells cross over the endothelium—a barrier of endothelial ...

Other

Doctor burnout costs health care system $4.6 billion a year

Burnout among doctors is costing the U.S. health-care system an estimated $4.6 billion a year in billings because of reduced hours, physician turnover, and expenses associated with finding and hiring replacements, according ...

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Mathematical model

A mathematical model uses mathematical language to describe a system. Mathematical models are used not only in the natural sciences and engineering disciplines (such as physics, biology, earth science, meteorology, and engineering) but also in the social sciences (such as economics, psychology, sociology and political science); physicists, engineers, computer scientists, and economists use mathematical models most extensively. The process of developing a mathematical model is termed 'mathematical modelling' (also modeling).

Eykhoff (1974) defined a mathematical model as 'a representation of the essential aspects of an existing system (or a system to be constructed) which presents knowledge of that system in usable form'.

Mathematical models can take many forms, including but not limited to dynamical systems, statistical models, differential equations, or game theoretic models. These and other types of models can overlap, with a given model involving a variety of abstract structures.

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