Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Novel tool predicts Buruli ulcer outbreaks in Victoria

Researchers have developed a surveillance system capable of detecting elevated risks of Buruli ulcer outbreaks in Victoria thanks to possum 'poo'—a breakthrough in the fight against the disease.

Oncology & Cancer

Change in breast density over time linked to cancer risk

Many middle-aged and older women get mammograms every one to two years to screen for breast cancer, as recommended by their doctors. A study by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis indicates ...

Health

Scientists devise new way to measure skin barrier function

The skin is the primary physical barrier against harmful substances in the environment. But there is a significant difference in the protective capacity of the skin across individuals. Knowing the health of one's skin and ...

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Mathematical model

A mathematical model uses mathematical language to describe a system. Mathematical models are used not only in the natural sciences and engineering disciplines (such as physics, biology, earth science, meteorology, and engineering) but also in the social sciences (such as economics, psychology, sociology and political science); physicists, engineers, computer scientists, and economists use mathematical models most extensively. The process of developing a mathematical model is termed 'mathematical modelling' (also modeling).

Eykhoff (1974) defined a mathematical model as 'a representation of the essential aspects of an existing system (or a system to be constructed) which presents knowledge of that system in usable form'.

Mathematical models can take many forms, including but not limited to dynamical systems, statistical models, differential equations, or game theoretic models. These and other types of models can overlap, with a given model involving a variety of abstract structures.

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