Cancer

Cancer cells' plasticity makes them harder to stop

When metastatic cancer cells need to avoid a threat, they simply reprogram themselves. Rice University scientists are beginning to get a handle on how they survive hostile environments.

Cancer

How do metastatic tumor cells grow in lymph nodes?

The spread of cancer to a new part of the body accounts for about 90 percent of cancer deaths. Cancer cells can spread from sites of origin to other parts of the body through blood vessels (blood-borne metastasis) or the ...

Health

Site of care may affect patients' access to palliative treatment

For patients at the end of life, palliative care can prolong survival and improve the quality of life for patients with a life-threatening illness and for their families. But studies have found that racial and ethnic minorities ...

Cancer

Breast cancer cells in mice tricked into turning into fat cells

As cancer cells respond to cues in their microenvironment, they can enter a highly plastic state in which they are susceptible to transdifferentiation into a different type of cell. Researchers at the University of Basel ...

page 1 from 23