Gerontology & Geriatrics

Breaking the vicious cycles of age-related diseases

Biologist Aleksey Belikov from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology has proposed that rapid progression of age-related diseases may result from the formation of so-called vicious cycles. An example of this is when ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Tuberculosis—Inhibiting host cell death with immunotherapy

Tuberculosis treatment still entails the administration of several antibiotics over a period of months and is torturous for many patients. The pathogen's increasing multidrug resistance additionally complicates this lengthy ...

Alzheimer's disease & dementia

Professional classical musicians are not protected from dementia

Listening and practicing music have been reported to have many beneficial effects on human health. The effect of music on human brain has been previously studied in young professionals but studies on the long-term effects ...

Cardiology

Heart attack care 'excellent around the clock'

Admission to hospital with a heart attack outside normal working hours does not appear to increase a patient's chance of dying in hospital, according to a study of more than 600,000 patient cases.

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Human respiratory viruses continue to spread in wild chimpanzees

Less than two years after the first report of wild chimpanzees in Uganda dying as a result of a human "common cold" virus, a new study has identified two other respiratory viruses of human origin in chimpanzee groups in the ...

Cancer

Cancer mortality milestone: 25 years of continuous decline

A steady, 25-year decline has resulted in a 27% drop in the overall cancer death rate in the United States, translating to approximately 2.6 million fewer cancer deaths between 1991 and 2016. The data come from Cancer Statistics, ...

Health

Mortality rates rising for Gens X and Y too

Declining life expectancies in the U.S. include Gen X and Y Americans, in addition to the older Baby Boomers. But the causes of premature mortality vary by race, gender and ethnicity, according to a new study from Duke University.

Cancer

Since 1999, uterine cancer incidence, mortality up

(HealthDay)—The incidence of uterine cancer and uterine cancer deaths has increased since 1999, according to research published in the Dec. 7 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Morbidity and Mortality ...

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Population history of American indigenous peoples

It is estimated, based on archaeological data and written records from European settlers, that from 8 to 140 million indigenous people lived in the Americas when the 1492 voyage of Christopher Columbus began a historical period of large-scale European interaction with the Americas. European contact with what they called the "New World" led to the European colonization of the Americas, with millions of emigrants (willing and unwilling) from the "Old World" eventually resettling in the Americas.

While the population of Old World peoples in the Americas steadily grew in the centuries after Columbus, the population of the American indigenous peoples plummeted. This was somewhat caused by direct conflict and warfare with European colonizers and other Native American tribes, but probably mostly due to their susceptibility to old world diseases [smallpox, influenza, bubonic and pneumonic plagues, etc.] that they had never before been exposed to. The extent (and to a lesser extent the causes) of this population decline have long been the subject of debate.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA