Cardiology

Registry helps move aortic dissection care forward

What began with a modest hospital grant at the University of Michigan in 1996 is now the world's leading source of data on diagnosis, treatments and outcomes for a rare and dangerous cardiac condition.

Neuroscience

Common treatment for multiple sclerosis may prolong life

Researchers from the University of British Columbia and Vancouver Coastal Health Research Institute have found that a widely prescribed drug for multiple sclerosis (MS) is associated with longer survival for patients.

Medications

Number of poisoning-related deaths in New Zealand remain high

While there has been a decline in carbon monoxide deaths in New Zealand, the number of deaths relating to poisoning remain high with new research revealing a surprising number of deaths involving two prescription medicines, ...

Health

Becoming active in middle age still offers health benefits

(HealthDay)—Becoming physically active in middle age may provide comparable health benefits to long-term participation in leisure-time physical activity (LTPA), according to a study published online March 8 in JAMA Network ...

Gerontology & Geriatrics

Breaking the vicious cycles of age-related diseases

Biologist Aleksey Belikov from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology has proposed that rapid progression of age-related diseases may result from the formation of so-called vicious cycles. An example of this is when ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Tuberculosis—Inhibiting host cell death with immunotherapy

Tuberculosis treatment still entails the administration of several antibiotics over a period of months and is torturous for many patients. The pathogen's increasing multidrug resistance additionally complicates this lengthy ...

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Population history of American indigenous peoples

It is estimated, based on archaeological data and written records from European settlers, that from 8 to 140 million indigenous people lived in the Americas when the 1492 voyage of Christopher Columbus began a historical period of large-scale European interaction with the Americas. European contact with what they called the "New World" led to the European colonization of the Americas, with millions of emigrants (willing and unwilling) from the "Old World" eventually resettling in the Americas.

While the population of Old World peoples in the Americas steadily grew in the centuries after Columbus, the population of the American indigenous peoples plummeted. This was somewhat caused by direct conflict and warfare with European colonizers and other Native American tribes, but probably mostly due to their susceptibility to old world diseases [smallpox, influenza, bubonic and pneumonic plagues, etc.] that they had never before been exposed to. The extent (and to a lesser extent the causes) of this population decline have long been the subject of debate.

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