Health

Tackling inequality could save millions of children

An unprecedented study mapping child deaths over almost two decades finds that nearly half of the 5.4 million under-five deaths in 2017 can be attributed to differences in child death rates within and across countries.

Health

Data breach fixes could impact patient care: study

IT security measures implemented following data breaches at hospitals may cost valuable time in delivering life-saving care, according to new research by Eric Johnson, Ralph Owen Dean and Bruce D. Henderson Professor of Strategy ...

Health

Curbing diesel emission could reduce big city mortality

U.S. cities could see a decline in mortality rates and an improved economy through midcentury if federal and local governments maintain stringent air pollution policies and diminish concentrations of diesel freight truck ...

Health

Racial/ethnic mortality disparities widen among many age groups

Years of progress towards reducing disparities in racial/ethnic group mortality rates in the United States came to a halt between 2009 and 2012, according to a new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Prior ...

Obstetrics & gynaecology

Decreasing the maternal mortality rate in Ghana

This past summer, students from the College of Life Sciences Department of Public Health worked to lower the maternal mortality rate in Ghana by developing a new app that connects pregnant women with their healthcare worker, ...

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Population history of American indigenous peoples

It is estimated, based on archaeological data and written records from European settlers, that from 8 to 140 million indigenous people lived in the Americas when the 1492 voyage of Christopher Columbus began a historical period of large-scale European interaction with the Americas. European contact with what they called the "New World" led to the European colonization of the Americas, with millions of emigrants (willing and unwilling) from the "Old World" eventually resettling in the Americas.

While the population of Old World peoples in the Americas steadily grew in the centuries after Columbus, the population of the American indigenous peoples plummeted. This was somewhat caused by direct conflict and warfare with European colonizers and other Native American tribes, but probably mostly due to their susceptibility to old world diseases [smallpox, influenza, bubonic and pneumonic plagues, etc.] that they had never before been exposed to. The extent (and to a lesser extent the causes) of this population decline have long been the subject of debate.

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