Pediatrics

2003 to 2017 saw drop in infant mortality due to birth defects

From 2003 to 2017, there was a decrease in infant mortality attributable to birth defects (IMBD) overall, although considerable differences were seen in the decreases by maternal and infant characteristics, according to research ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Higher rates of post-natal depression among autistic mothers

Autistic mothers are more likely to report post-natal depression compared to non-autistic mothers, according to a new study of mothers of autistic children carried out by researchers at the University of Cambridge. A better ...

Pediatrics

Kangaroo mother care reduces infant mortality

Researchers at Centre for Intervention Science in Maternal and Child Health (CISMAC) at the University of Bergen (UiB) followed 8400 low birth weight infants, from 2015 to 2018.

Health

Medicaid expansion improves access to postpartum care

Study comparing Utah and Colorado finds Medicaid expansion helped prevent new mothers from losing coverage to the "postpartum coverage cliff," with implications for reducing maternal mortality.

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Study reveals breastfeeding could protect babies from malaria

In a world first, researchers from The University of Western Australia have taken the first step towards understanding whether it may be possible for breastfeeding mothers to naturally vaccinate their babies against malaria—one ...

Neuroscience

Antiepileptic drug exposure low in breastfeeding infants

(HealthDay)—Among infants breastfed by mothers who are receiving drug therapy for epilepsy, antiepileptic drug (AED) concentrations in infant blood samples are substantially lower than those in maternal blood samples, according ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Parental coaching adolescents through peer stress

During early adolescence, especially the transition to middle school, kids face a number of challenges both socially and academically. Peer rejection, bullying, and conflict with friends are common social stressors. These ...

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Mothers

Mothers (formerly the Carlton Ballroom) was a club in Birmingham, England during the late 1960s and early 1970s. Mothers opened above an old furniture store in Erdington High Street on August 9, 1968. The club, run by promoter Phil Myatt, closed its doors on 3 January 1971. Between these times, more than 400 acts performed there, many of whom went on to greater success.

Possibly the most significant of the live recordings that took place in Mothers was Pink Floyd's Ummagumma, a double-album on EMI's new label Harvest. It was released in October and featured two live sides, part recorded at Mothers on April 27, 1969 and part at Manchester College of Commerce in June 1969.

The Who performed Tommy and Traffic's world debut took place at Mothers along with fledgling rock bands like Black Sabbath playing some of their earliest gigs there.

Some of the better known rock bands to play Mothers include: Family, Fleetwood Mac, The Edgar Broughton Band, Traffic, Free, Roy Harper, Blodwyn Pig, Strawbs, Quintessence, Steppenwolf, Black Sabbath, Deep Purple, Jethro Tull, Jon Hiseman's Colosseum, Skid Row (with Gary Moore), The Nice, Tyrannosaurus Rex, The Who, Fairport Convention, King Crimson, Led Zeppelin, Soft Machine, The Chicago Transit Authority and the Bonzo Dog Doo Dah Band.

Mothers was voted number one rock venue in the world by America's Billboard magazine and John Peel, a regular DJ at the club, was quoted as saying: "People are amazed to hear that for a few years the best club in Britain was in Erdington."

Roy Harper later told Brum Beat magazine:

That was the first club outside London that meant anything at all and that's why there's been this long association [of Harper] with Birmingham. I played there about six times between 1968 and 1970. I have always enjoyed playing here.

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