Medical research

Age-resistant quiescent stem cells support muscle regeneration

Researchers from the Computational Biology group at the University of Luxembourg's Luxembourg Centre for Systems Biology (LCSB) participated in an international study focusing on adult stem cells in muscle tissue. The results ...

Medical research

Damaged muscles don't just die, they regenerate themselves

A research collaboration between Kumamoto University and Nagasaki University in Japan has found that components leaking from broken muscle fibers activate "satellite" muscle stem cells. While attempting to identify the proteins ...

Medical research

Location, location, location: New research on glycogen storage

When a group of cyclists set off to climb Mount Etna on the 3rd stage of Giro d'Italia today, they will have definitely eaten large amounts of carbohydrates in the form of pasta, rice or potatoes within the past few days. ...

Medical research

Generation of three-dimensional heart organoids

Researchers from Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) use mouse embryonic stem cells to engineer three-dimensional functional heart organoids resembling the developing heart

Diabetes

Enzyme insight could lead to new diabetes treatment

Research led by the Centenary Institute has discovered that the lack of an enzyme in the liver called sphingosine kinase 2 (SphK2) results in pronounced insulin resistance and glucose intolerance, both symptoms of early stage ...

page 1 from 100

Muscle

Muscle (from Latin musculus, diminutive of mus "mouse") is the contractile tissue of the body and is derived from the mesodermal layer of embryonic germ cells. Muscle cells contain contractile filaments that move past each other and change the size of the cell. They are classified as skeletal, cardiac, or smooth muscles. Their function is to produce force and cause motion. Muscles can cause either locomotion of the organism itself or movement of internal organs. Cardiac and smooth muscle contraction occurs without conscious thought and is necessary for survival. Examples are the contraction of the heart and peristalsis which pushes food through the digestive system. Voluntary contraction of the skeletal muscles is used to move the body and can be finely controlled. Examples are movements of the eye, or gross movements like the quadriceps muscle of the thigh. There are two broad types of voluntary muscle fibers: slow twitch and fast twitch. Slow twitch fibers contract for long periods of time but with little force while fast twitch fibers contract quickly and powerfully but fatigue very rapidly.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA