Sports medicine & Kinesiology

Lifelong female exercisers benefit from better muscle function

Exercising throughout a woman's life may help preserve muscle power during the aging process, according to recent research. The study, the first to examine the effects of lifelong aerobic exercise on a woman's muscles as ...

Health

Have a ball with these exercises to strengthen your core

(HealthDay)—Pilates is an excellent exercise discipline that develops strength and agility, and you don't need to take formal classes or use Pilates machines to get its benefits. Using a stability ball with floor exercises ...

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Muscle

Muscle (from Latin musculus, diminutive of mus "mouse") is the contractile tissue of the body and is derived from the mesodermal layer of embryonic germ cells. Muscle cells contain contractile filaments that move past each other and change the size of the cell. They are classified as skeletal, cardiac, or smooth muscles. Their function is to produce force and cause motion. Muscles can cause either locomotion of the organism itself or movement of internal organs. Cardiac and smooth muscle contraction occurs without conscious thought and is necessary for survival. Examples are the contraction of the heart and peristalsis which pushes food through the digestive system. Voluntary contraction of the skeletal muscles is used to move the body and can be finely controlled. Examples are movements of the eye, or gross movements like the quadriceps muscle of the thigh. There are two broad types of voluntary muscle fibers: slow twitch and fast twitch. Slow twitch fibers contract for long periods of time but with little force while fast twitch fibers contract quickly and powerfully but fatigue very rapidly.

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