Psychology & Psychiatry

People track when talkers say 'uh' to predict what comes next

Spontaneous conversation is riddled with disfluencies such as pauses and 'uhm's: On average, people produce 6 disfluencies every 100 words. But disfluencies do not occur randomly. Instead, 'uh' typically occurs before 'hard-to-name' ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Ga-ga, goo-goo, why a baby likes you

By the age of one, infants already prefer speakers of their native tongue, but do not necessarily view speakers of an unfamiliar language negatively, according to new UBC research. The findings suggest that, while positivity ...

Neuroscience

Trying, and failing, to forget has lasting effects

Listening to a traffic report before leaving for work or school may be part of your daily routine. But how does your brain sort through the entire report and only recall the fastest route to your destination, and then forget ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

How the language you speak changes your view of the world

Bilinguals get all the perks. Better job prospects, a cognitive boost and even protection against dementia. Now new research shows that they can also view the world in different ways depending on the specific language they ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Some people may be pre-wired to be bilingual

(HealthDay)—Some people's brains seem pre-wired to acquire a second language, new research suggests. But anyone who tries to move beyond their mother tongue will likely gain a brain boost, the small study finds.

Psychology & Psychiatry

Learning languages is a workout for brains, both young and old

Learning a new language changes your brain network both structurally and functionally, according to Penn State researchers. "Learning and practicing something, for instance a second language, strengthens the brain," said ...

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