Psychology & Psychiatry

Why children struggle with the 'cocktail party effect'

Researchers have clarified the development of the ability to attend to a speaker in a noisy environment—a phenomenon known as the "cocktail party effect." Published in JNeurosci, the study could have implications for helping ...

Neuroscience

Visual cues amplify sound

Looking at someone's lips is good for listening in noisy environments because it helps our brains amplify the sounds we're hearing in time with what we're seeing, finds a new UCL-led study.

Neuroscience

Your next hearing aid could be a video game

Roughly 15 percent of Americans report some sort of hearing difficulty; trouble understanding conversations in noisy environments is one of the most common complaints. Unfortunately, there's not much doctors or audiologists ...

Neuroscience

Ability to process speech declines with age

Researchers have found clues to the causes of age-related hearing loss. The ability to track and understand speech in both quiet and noisy environments deteriorates due in part to speech processing declines in both the midbrain ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Background noise may hinder toddlers' ability to learn words

The environments children are in, including how much and what kinds of stimulation they are exposed to, influence what and how they learn. One important task for children is zeroing in on the information that's relevant to ...

Neuroscience

How songbirds may help build a better hearing aid

(Medical Xpress)—Untreated hearing loss can have devastating and alienating repercussions on a person's life: isolation, depression, sapped cognition, even dementia.

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

New study brings scientists a step closer to silencing tinnitus

New research funded by charity Action on Hearing Loss suggests that tinnitus can be eliminated by blocking signals between the ear and brain, offering hope to suffers that a cure is within reach, with prolonged exposure to ...

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