Psychology & Psychiatry

Nucleus accumbens recruited by cocaine, sugar are different

Nucleus accumbens in the brain play a central role in the risk-reward circuit. Their operation is based chiefly on three essential neurotransmitters: dopamine, which promotes desire; serotonin, whose effects include satiety ...

Neuroscience

Brain imaging can predict childhood weight gain

A greater density of cells in a key reward center of the brain is associated with obesity in children and predicts future weight gain, a new Yale-led study finds.

Psychology & Psychiatry

Here's why we crave food even when we're not hungry

Food cravings are very familiar to most people. We may see or smell food and want to eat, or sometimes we suddenly feel like eating something delicious. These intense desires occur even when we're not hungry and can be very ...

Neuroscience

The (neuro)science of getting and staying motivated

There is no question that motivation is one of the hardest and yet important factors in life. It's the difference between success and failure, goal-setting and aimlessness, well-being and unhappiness. And yet, why is it so ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Arguments between couples: Our neurons like mediation

When couples argue, mediation by a third party improves the outcome of the confrontation. But that's not all: mediation is also linked to heightened activity in key regions of the brain belonging to the reward circuit—this ...

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