Oncology & Cancer

Men face higher risk of cancers linked to oral sex

Men are twice as likely as women to get cancer of the mouth and throat linked to the human papillomavirus, or HPV, one of the most common sexually transmitted infections, researchers say.

Neuroscience

Birth control pills affect memory, study finds

Women who use contraceptives like birth control pills experience memory changes, according to new UC Irvine research. Their ability to remember the gist of an emotional event improves, while women not using the contraceptives ...

Obstetrics & gynaecology

'Oral' bacteria may disrupt the balance of the vaginal microbiome

Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is an imbalance of the vaginal microbiome that can lead to adverse health outcomes, including increased likelihood of potential pathogens colonizing the vagina, yet the mechanisms underlying these ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Four emerging STIs that you can't afford to ignore

New diseases emerge all the time, and sexually transmitted infections are no exception. Here are four bacteria that could become serious public health threats. (Warning: contains a description of animal auto-fellatio.)

Oncology & Cancer

Why throat cancers are on the rise, and why it matters to you

Who among us hasn't had a sore throat, a hoarse voice or a lump in the neck? Usually these are minor problems that go away on their own or after a course of antibiotics—but if they don't, check in with your doctor. These ...

Health

Having less sex linked to earlier menopause

Women who engage in sexual activity weekly or monthly have a lower risk of entering menopause early relative to those who report having some form of sex less than monthly, according to a new UCL study.

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Sperm can carry Ebola for 82 days: WHO

Sperm can carry the Ebola virus for at least 82 days, the World Health Organization said Friday, urging men recovering from the disease to use condoms for three months after the onset of symptoms.

Oncology & Cancer

Incidence of HPV-positive head and neck cancer up in the U.S.

(HealthDay)—The rate of head and neck cancers has risen since the 1970s, and most are linked to human papillomavirus (HPV), according to a study recently published in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.

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