Medications

Co-treatments help beat peanut allergies

Desensitising children to peanut allergies through oral immunotherapy is more effective when done in conjunction with antihistamines and probiotics, South Australian researchers have found.

Health

Better choices for a fast, healthy lunch

(HealthDay)—Rushed for lunch? Yes, that nearby fast-food chain is convenient, but by tweaking your choices you can cut unwanted salt, fat and calories.

Immunology

Peanut allergy vaccine to rewrite the immune system

Peanut allergies could become a thing of the past as breakthrough research from the University of South Australia develops a radically novel vaccination that's poised to cure the potentially life threatening condition.

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Peanut

The peanut, or groundnut (Arachis hypogaea), is a species in the legume family (Fabaceae) native to South America, Mexico and Central America. [1] It is an annual herbaceous plant growing to 30 to 50 cm (1 to 1.5 ft) tall. The leaves are opposite, pinnate with four leaflets (two opposite pairs; no terminal leaflet), each leaflet 1 to 7 cm (⅜ to 2¾ in) long and 1 to 3 cm (⅜ to 1 inch) broad. The flowers are a typical peaflower in shape, 2 to 4 cm (¾ to 1½ in) across, yellow with reddish veining. After pollination, the fruit develops into a legume 3 to 7 cm (1 to 2 in) long, containing 1 to 4 seeds, which forces its way underground to mature.

Peanuts are also known as earthnuts, ground nuts, goobers, goober peas, pindas, jack nuts, pinders, manila nuts, g-nuts, and monkey nuts; the last of these is often used to mean the entire pod.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA