Pediatrics

Midwives key to promoting vaccines, but more training is needed

A new study shows many midwives receive little or no training on how to communicate to expectant parents the importance of maternal and childhood vaccines despite being the most trusted source of information on vaccines in ...

Medications

Whooping cough evolving to beat antibiotics and possibly vaccine

A new strain of Bordetella pertussis – the bacterium that causes whooping cough – has become resistant to antibiotic treatment and may also be resistant to the vaccine used in China. A UNSW Sydney academic says the growing ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Whopping numbers on whooping cough

(HealthDay)—The return of measles made headlines in recent years, but it's not the only disease that poses a particular threat to kids that has experienced a resurgence.

Pediatrics

Infant ab levels highest with Tdap vax in early 3rd trimester

(HealthDay)—Tetanus, diphtheria, and acellular pertussis (Tdap) vaccines given to pregnant women early in the third trimester may offer the most protection against infant pertussis, according to a study published in the ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

CDC: Vaccination rates more than 95 percent for kindergartners

(HealthDay)—Overall vaccination coverage is high among the nation's kindergarten students, according to research published in the Oct. 12 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Whooping cough vaccine: The power of first impressions

The current whooping cough vaccine was universally adopted in the US in 1996 to replace the original vaccine based on killed Bordetella pertussis because of a stronger safety profile. The new formulation was found to be effective ...

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Pertussis

Pertussis, also known as whooping cough ( /ˈhuːpɪŋ kɒf/ or /ˈhwuːpɪŋ kɒf/), is a highly contagious bacterial disease caused by Bordetella pertussis. Symptoms are initially mild, and then develop into severe coughing fits, which produce the namesake high-pitched "whoop" sound in infected babies and children when they inhale air after coughing. The coughing stage lasts for approximately six weeks before subsiding. In some countries, this disease is called the 100 days' cough or cough of 100 days.

Prevention via vaccination is of primary importance as treatment is of little clinical benefit to the person infected. Antibiotics, however, do decrease the duration of infectiousness and are thus recommended. It is estimated that the disease currently affects 48.5 million people yearly, resulting in nearly 295,000 deaths.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA