Obstetrics & gynaecology

Preeclampsia during pregnancy increases stroke risk later in life

Women who have preeclampsia during pregnancy are at least three times more likely to have strokes later in life than women who do not have a history of this condition, according to University of Utah Health scientists. Based ...

Cardiology

USPSTF recommends low-dose aspirin to prevent preeclampsia

(HealthDay)—The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends the use of low-dose aspirin as preventive medication after 12 weeks of gestation for persons at high risk for preeclampsia. This recommendation forms ...

Obstetrics & gynaecology

Important cause of preeclampsia discovered

Despite being the subject of increasing interest for a whole century, how preeclampsia develops has been unclear—until now.

Obstetrics & gynaecology

Researchers make strides in detecting preeclampsia risk

Preeclampsia, a pregnancy complication characterized by high blood pressure, occurs in about 7 percent of pregnancies and is a leading cause of maternal mortality and premature birth. The condition can appear in a variety ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

A pregnancy ended by COVID-19 informs new understanding and protocols

When the first pregnant woman diagnosed with COVID-19 was admitted to Yale New Haven Hospital in March, she was in her second trimester and critically ill. At the time, almost nothing was known about how the novel coronavirus ...

Obstetrics & gynaecology

Researchers find a link between genes and preeclampsia

Preeclampsia is globally a leading cause of illness and deaths among mothers and their babies. This severe pregnancy disorder occurs in up to five percent of all pregnancies.

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Pre-eclampsia

Pre-eclampsia or preeclampsia is a medical condition in which hypertension arises in pregnancy (pregnancy-induced hypertension) in association with significant amounts of protein in the urine.

Pre-eclampsia refers to a set of symptoms rather than any causative factor, and there are many different causes for the condition. It appears likely that there are substances from the placenta that can cause endothelial dysfunction in the maternal blood vessels of susceptible women. While blood pressure elevation is the most visible sign of the disease, it involves generalized damage to the maternal endothelium, kidneys, and liver, with the release of vasoconstrictive factors being secondary to the original damage.

Pre-eclampsia may develop from 20 weeks gestation (it is considered early onset before 32 weeks, which is associated with increased morbidity). Its progress differs among patients; most cases are diagnosed pre-term. Pre-eclampsia may also occur up to six weeks post-partum. Apart from Caesarean section or induction of labor (and therefore delivery of the placenta), there is no known cure. It is the most common of the dangerous pregnancy complications; it may affect both the mother and the unborn child.

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