Obstetrics & gynaecology

Improving pregnancy outcomes for black women

In June of 2018, tennis champion Serena Williams stunned the world by revealing the terrifying aftermath of giving birth to her daughter Olympia. With a history of blood clots, Williams was acutely aware of the post-delivery ...

Cardiology

Treatments for preeclampsia

Researchers at ETH Zurich have used trials with mice to shed light on signalling pathways that lead to thickened and less elastic blood vessels. They have developed a treatment approach for pregnant women with previously ...

Obstetrics & gynaecology

ACOG updates guidelines for gestational HTN, preeclampsia

(HealthDay)—The American College of Obstetricians & Gynecologists (ACOG) has updated its guidance on the management of gestational hypertension and preeclampsia as well as chronic hypertension in pregnant women; the two ...

Medical research

RNAi therapy mitigates preeclampsia symptoms

A collaboration of scientists from the University of Massachusetts Medical School, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Western Sydney University, have shown that an innovative new type of therapy using small interfering ...

Cardiology

Preeclampsia tied to tripling of dementia in later life

(HealthDay)—High blood pressure during pregnancy can be a sign of preeclampsia—a potentially life-threatening complication. Now, new research suggests preeclampsia might also make women more vulnerable to a specific type ...

Cardiology

Preeclampsia: We can do more

Each year, more than 10,000 pregnant women in Australia suffer from preeclampsia and 30,000 die from it on a global level. The condition, characterized by high blood pressure, can be fatal and have long-term health effects ...

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Pre-eclampsia

Pre-eclampsia or preeclampsia is a medical condition in which hypertension arises in pregnancy (pregnancy-induced hypertension) in association with significant amounts of protein in the urine.

Pre-eclampsia refers to a set of symptoms rather than any causative factor, and there are many different causes for the condition. It appears likely that there are substances from the placenta that can cause endothelial dysfunction in the maternal blood vessels of susceptible women. While blood pressure elevation is the most visible sign of the disease, it involves generalized damage to the maternal endothelium, kidneys, and liver, with the release of vasoconstrictive factors being secondary to the original damage.

Pre-eclampsia may develop from 20 weeks gestation (it is considered early onset before 32 weeks, which is associated with increased morbidity). Its progress differs among patients; most cases are diagnosed pre-term. Pre-eclampsia may also occur up to six weeks post-partum. Apart from Caesarean section or induction of labor (and therefore delivery of the placenta), there is no known cure. It is the most common of the dangerous pregnancy complications; it may affect both the mother and the unborn child.

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