Psychology & Psychiatry

Your spouse's voice is easier to hear—and easier to ignore

With so many other competing voices, having a conversation on a bustling subway or at a crowded cocktail party takes a great deal of concentration. New research suggests that the familiar voice of a spouse stands out against ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Psychology's diversity problem

Lack of diversity in psychological research is a serious problem that needs to be addressed, according to an Australian academic.

Psychology & Psychiatry

'Knowing how' is in your brain

Although we often think of knowledge as "knowing that" (for example, knowing that Paris is the capital of France), each of us also knows many procedures consisting of "knowing how," such as knowing how to tie a knot or start ...

Neuroscience

Researchers find neural signature of 'mental time travel'

Almost everyone has experienced one memory triggering another, but explanations for that phenomenon have proved elusive. Now, University of Pennsylvania researchers have provided the first neurobiological evidence that memories ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Human obedience: The myth of blind conformity

In the 1960s and 1970s, classic social psychological studies were conducted that provided evidence that even normal, decent people can engage in acts of extreme cruelty when instructed to do so by others. However, in an essay ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Babies are born with 'intuitive physics' knowledge, researcher says

While it may appear that infants are helpless creatures that only blink, eat, cry and sleep, one University of Missouri researcher says that studies indicate infant brains come equipped with knowledge of "intuitive physics."

Neuroscience

How well do you know the back of your hand, really?

Many of us are spending a lot of time looking at our hands lately and we think we know them pretty well. But research from York University's Centre for Vision Research shows the way our brains perceive our hands is inaccurate.

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