Neuroscience

Study shows benefits of delayed cord clamping in healthy babies

A five-minute delay in the clamping of healthy infants' umbilical cords results in increased iron stores and brain myelin in areas important for early-life functional development, a new University of Rhode Island nursing ...

Immunology

Scientists stumble upon a model to study a lethal complication

More and more hospitalized patients with sepsis are being diagnosed with a deadly complication characterized by high levels of inflammation. A team of Yale researchers has uncovered clues to the cause of this complication—which ...

Medical research

Vitamin D and immune cells stimulate bone marrow disease

The bone marrow disease myelofibrosis is stimulated by excessive signaling from vitamin D and immune cells known as macrophages, reveals a Japanese research team. These findings could help to develop alternative treatments ...

Medical research

Fasting ramps up human metabolism, study shows

Fasting may help people lose weight, but new research suggests going without food may also boost human metabolic activity, generate antioxidants, and help reverse some effects of aging. Scientists at the Okinawa Institute ...

Medical research

Scientists have identified a bone marrow backup system

New research from the Stowers Institute for Medical Research has identified the backup for an important biological system—the hematopoietic system, whose adult stem cells constantly replenish the body's blood supply.

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Red blood cell

Red blood cells are the most common type of blood cell and the vertebrate body's principal means of delivering oxygen to the body tissues via the blood. They take up oxygen in the lungs or gills and release it while squeezing through the body's capillaries. The cells are filled with hemoglobin, a biomolecule that can bind to oxygen. The blood's red color is due to the color of oxygen-rich hemoglobin. In humans, red blood cells develop in the bone marrow and live for about 120 days; they take the form of flexible biconcave disks that lack a cell nucleus and organelles and they cannot synthesize protein.

Red blood cells are also known as RBCs, red blood corpuscles (an archaic term), haematids or erythrocytes (from Greek erythros for "red" and kytos for "hollow", with cyte translated as "cell" in modern usage). The capitalized term Red Blood Cells is the proper name in the US for erythrocytes in storage solution used in transfusion medicine.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA