Psychology & Psychiatry

Psychologist consults on 'Inside Out' emotions

When UC Berkeley psychologist Dacher Keltner attended the Hollywood premiere of the new Pixar movie Inside Out – which opens Friday in theaters nationwide – he was thrilled to see children running around the purple (not ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Research shows that kids as young as 18 months understand stoicism

When you're one and a half years old, having your favourite ball taken away is likely to result in a temper tantrum. But while babies wear their feelings on the sleeves of their onesies, adults often mask their emotions, ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Personalizing bipolar disorder treatment

Rapidly swinging from extremes of joy and energy to sadness, fatigue, and confusion, bipolar disorder (BD) patients feel desperate and largely alone in the world. And according to the National Institutes of Health, between ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Sad music hits positive notes of emotional rewards

(Medical Xpress)—Sadness is discouraged; it's a mood to flee. We tell children not to look so sad. We tell adults to wipe that sad look off their face and smile. We worry that prolonged sadness needs medical attention. ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Research finds genetic differential in stress response

(Medical Xpress)—Genetics play a role in whether stress makes people depressed and in how quickly they recover, new research on the effects of the 9/11 terrorist bombing finds.

Psychology & Psychiatry

Anti-smoking TV ads should use anger, study suggests

Anti-smoking television advertisements that appeal to viewers' emotions are more persuasive when they use anger rather than sadness, a Dartmouth-Cornell study suggests.

Psychology & Psychiatry

Is depression over-diagnosed and over-treated?

(Medical Xpress)—A University of Liverpool study has found that people are increasingly diagnosed and treated with medication for depression when they are suffering 'normal' human experiences such as grief and sadness.

Psychology & Psychiatry

'Seeing' faces through touch

Our sense of touch can contribute to our ability to perceive faces, according to new research published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.

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