Neuroscience

Sleep readies synapses for learning

Synapses in the hippocampus are larger and stronger after sleep deprivation, according to new research in mice published in JNeurosci. Overall, this study supports the idea that sleep may universally weaken synapses that ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Anthropologist explores 'the science of dads'

Want to do something special for a father on June 16? Try asking him what he finds most rewarding—and most challenging—about being a dad.

Neuroscience

A sleep-deprived brain interprets impressions negatively

A sleepless night not only leaves us fatigued and distracted, it also makes us interpret things more negatively and makes us more likely to lose our temper. Moreover, people suffering from a pollen allergy are at a high risk ...

Health

How much sleep do teenagers really need?

Parents worry about whether their teenagers are getting enough sleep. Research studies suggest that teenagers are suffering an "epidemic of sleep deprivation" globally —one that will have long-term health impacts.

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Sleep deprivation

Sleep deprivation, having too little sleep, can be either chronic or acute. Long-term sleep deprivation causes death in lab animals. A chronic sleep-restricted state can cause fatigue, daytime sleepiness, clumsiness and weight gain.

Complete absence of sleep over long periods is impossible to achieve; brief microsleeps cannot be avoided.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA