Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Q&A: COVID-19 vaccine myths

There has been a lot of news coverage about the COVID-19 vaccines recently developed and now being administered across the U.S.

Psychology & Psychiatry

Social holidays improve overall well-being

Social holidays improve people's overall satisfaction with life, as well as satisfaction with the quantity and quality of their leisure time and social life, according to a new study from the University of Eastern Finland. ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

COVID-19 vaccine myths debunked

A vaccine to prevent coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is perhaps the best hope for ending the pandemic. A number of biopharmaceutical companies have applied for U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) emergency use authorization ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Creative workshops can aid mental health recovery

Artistic mediums such as visual art, music, dance and creative writing may empower people recovering from mental health issues to share their stories and gain confidence and understanding of their illness.

Psychology & Psychiatry

Empathy and perspective taking: How social skills are built

Being able to feel empathy and to take in the other person's perspective – these are two abilities through which we understand what is going on in the other person's mind. Although both terms are in constant circulation, ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Are you afraid you might have agoraphobia?

Agoraphobia (ag-uh-ruh-FOE-be-uh) is a type of anxiety disorder in which you fear and avoid places or situations that might cause you to panic and make you feel trapped, helpless or embarrassed. You fear an actual or anticipated ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Brain stimulation may increase control of emotional actions

To function well in society, people must be able to control their emotional reactions from time to time. This usually goes well, but this control can fail, for example with aggressive behavior in traffic or in people with ...

Cardiology

Social factors are key to identifying heart disease risk

Asking people simple questions about their social situation in addition to medical measures will give a more accurate picture of who might have a heart attack in the future, finds a study led by UCL researchers.

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