Medications

Prices for new brand-name prescription drugs spike

A new study out of Brigham and Women's Hospital shows how newly marketed brand-name drugs in the U.S. are driving up health care spending, resulting in "detrimental effects for patient access and affordability."

Oncology & Cancer

High cost of cancer care in the U.S. doesn't reduce mortality rates

While the U.S. spends twice as much on cancer care as the average high-income country, its cancer mortality rates are only slightly better than average, according to a new analysis by researchers at Yale University and Vassar ...

Medications

Report: Remdesivir dominated hospital drug spending in 2021

The COVID-19 treatment remdesivir dominated hospital drug spending in 2021, accounting for nearly 10% of all pharmaceutical expenses and outpacing the next three drugs combined, according to the National Trends in Prescription ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Fungal infections cost U.S. $6.7B in a year

New research from the University of Georgia found that fungal infections account for $6.7 billion in health care spending in 2018. And that's just the cases that were directly responsible for inpatient hospital stays.

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Consumption (economics)

Consumption is a common concept in economics, and gives rise to derived concepts such as consumer debt. Generally consumption is defined by opposition to production. But the precise definition can vary because different schools of economists define production quite differently. According to some economists, only the final purchase of goods and services constitutes consumption, and every other commercial activity is some form of production. Other economists define consumption much more broadly, as the aggregate of all economic activity that does not entail the design, production and marketing of goods and services (e.g. "the selection, adoption, use, disposal and recycling of goods and services").

Likewise, consumption can be measured by a variety of different metrics such as energy in energy economics . The total consumer spending in an economy is generally calculated using the consumption function, a metric devised by John Maynard Keynes, which simply takes the aggregate disposable income and multiplies it by a "marginal propensity to consume". This metric essentially defines consumption as the part of disposable income that does not go into savings. But disposable income in turn can be defined in a number of ways - e.g. to include borrowed funds or expenditures from savings.

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