Medical research

An 'EpiPen' for spinal cord injuries

An injection of nanoparticles can prevent the body's immune system from overreacting to trauma, potentially preventing some spinal cord injuries from resulting in paralysis.

Neuroscience

First step to induce self-repair in the central nervous system

Damaged peripheral nerves can regenerate after an injury, for example, following a forearm fracture. Axons, the long projections of neurons that transmit stimuli or signals to other cells, are affected in the case of injury ...

Neuroscience

Researchers discover new nerve pathway in the body

A newly discovered nerve pathway that connects the foot and the face on the same side of the body may potentially provide explanations to unknown neurological conditions, according to new research led by Curtin University.

Neuroscience

Fooling nerve cells into acting normal

Nerve cells, or neurons—specifically the "workhorse cells" involved in walking, breathing and chewing—can adjust to changes in the body, but they never stop working unless there is an fatal injury. What exactly signals ...

Neuroscience

In lab, researchers flip pain switch in spinal cord cells

Facing an urgent need for safer and more effective therapies for those suffering from debilitating pain in the midst of an opioid crisis, Saint Louis University researchers are on a mission to find a non-narcotic off-switch ...

Neuroscience

The GPS of neurons now better understood

Our nerves consist of small cables responsible for circulating information to every part of our body, allowing us, for instance, to move. These cables are actually cells called neurons with long extensions named axons.

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Spinal cord injury

Spinal cord injuries cause myelopathy or damage to white matter or myelinated fiber tracts that carry signals to and from the brain. It also damages gray matter in the central part of the cord, causing segmental losses of interneurons and motorneurons. Spinal cord injury can occur from many causes, including:

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