Psychology & Psychiatry

Another victim of violence: Trust in those who mean no harm

Exposure to violence does not change the ability to learn who is likely to do harm, but it does damage the ability to place trust in "good people," psychologists at Yale and University of Oxford report April 26 in the journal ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Is big-city living eroding our nice instinct?

A new study by University of Miami psychology researchers of anonymous interactions suggests that humans switch off their automatic inclination to share in dealings with strangers.

Psychology & Psychiatry

The soothing effects of strangers

Is pain treatment more helpful if it is provided by a friend, or is the help of a stranger better? A study conducted by researchers from the Universities of Wuerzburg, Amsterdam and Zurich investigated this question and found ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

We are predisposed to forgive, new research suggests

When assessing the moral character of others, people cling to good impressions but readily adjust their opinions about those who have behaved badly, according to new research.

Psychology & Psychiatry

Why do we trust, or not trust, strangers? The answer is Pavlovian

Our trust in strangers is dependent on their resemblance to others we've previously known, finds a new study by a team of psychology researchers. Its results show that strangers resembling past individuals known to be trustworthy ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Empathy with strangers can be learned

We can learn to empathize with strangers. Surprisingly positive experiences with people from another group trigger a learning effect in the brain, which increases empathy. As researchers from the University of Zurich reveal, ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

A little help from your friends just increases pain

Maybe misery doesn't love company. When physical pain is involved, having an equally suffering friend nearby just makes you feel worse, according to a study published online Thursday in the journal Current Biology.

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