Health

Study links shorter sleep and sugar-sweetened drink consumption

People who sleep five or fewer hours a night are likely to also drink significantly more sugary caffeinated drinks, such as sodas and energy drinks, according to a new study of more than 18,000 adults led by UC San Francisco ...

Health

AMA adopts policy to cut sugar sweetened drink consumption

(HealthDay)—At the annual meeting of the American Medical Association (AMA), a policy was adopted to reduce the consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) as a way to reduce the amount of sugar that Americans consume.

Health

Graphic warning labels linked to reduced sugary drink purchases

Warning labels that include photos linking sugary drink consumption with obesity, type 2 diabetes, and tooth decay, may reduce purchases of the drinks, according to a new study by researchers from Harvard T.H. Chan School ...

Health

A sweet tooth can be taxing

A tax on sweetened drinks would save $666 million in oral health costs over a decade, a study by The University of Queensland has found.

Overweight & Obesity

Some calories more harmful than others

While calories from any food have the potential to increase the risk of obesity and other cardiometabolic diseases, 22 nutrition researchers agree that sugar-sweetened beverages play a unique role in chronic health problems. ...

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