Psychology & Psychiatry

Another victim of violence: Trust in those who mean no harm

Exposure to violence does not change the ability to learn who is likely to do harm, but it does damage the ability to place trust in "good people," psychologists at Yale and University of Oxford report April 26 in the journal ...

Neuroscience

Resilience may be neurobiological

Neighborhood violence has been associated with adverse health effects on youth, including sleep loss, asthma and metabolic syndrome. Yet some youth living in high-crime neighborhoods manage to avoid these effects.

Addiction

The influence of drugs on murder rates is being overstated

The latest data on UK homicide rates shows that 31% of victims and suspects were "under the influence" of alcohol and other drugs at the time of death. Drugs and alcohol continue to be a convenient scapegoat when it comes ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Violence and adversity in early life can alter the brain

Childhood adversity is a significant problem in the US, particularly for children growing up in poverty. Those who experience poverty have a much higher risk of being exposed to violence and suffering from a lack of social ...

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Violence

Violence is the expression of physical force against self or other, compelling action against one's will on pain of being hurt. Variant uses of the term refer to the destruction of non-living objects (see property damage). Worldwide, violence is used as a tool of manipulation and also is an area of concern for law and culture which take attempts to suppress and stop it. The word violence covers a broad spectrum. It can vary from between a physical altercation between two beings where a slight injury may be the outcome to war and genocide where millions may die as a result.

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