Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

New vaccine holds promise in fighting diarrheal disease

Scientists at Oregon Health & Science University have teamed up with OHSU spinoff, Najít Technologies, Inc. to develop a new vaccine that appears to confer immunity to a diarrheal disease that afflicts hundreds of millions ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

When mosquito and tick season meets COVID-19

With COVID-19 restrictions easing, people are spending more time at socially distanced outdoor gatherings, whether picnics in parks with friends or backyard movie nights with neighbors. But as we escape the confines of COVID-19 ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Video: Can coronavirus be transmitted by mosquitoes?

Can coronavirus be transmitted by mosquitoes? Mosquitoes are a vector for some of the world's deadliest diseases, like malaria, West Nile virus, and dengue fever, so it's natural to worry if they can also spread COVID-19.

page 1 from 27

West Nile virus

West Nile virus (or WNV) is a virus of the family Flaviviridae. Part of the Japanese encephalitis (JE) antigenic complex of viruses, it is found in both tropical and temperate regions. It mainly infects birds, but is known to infect humans, horses, dogs, cats, bats, chipmunks, skunks, squirrels, and domestic rabbits. The main route of human infection is through the bite of an infected mosquito.

Image reconstructions and cryoelectron microscopy reveal a 45–50 nm virion covered with a relatively smooth protein surface. This structure is similar to the dengue fever virus; both belong to the genus Flavivirus within the family Flaviviridae. The genetic material of WNV is a positive-sense, single strand of RNA, which is between 11,000 and 12,000 nucleotides long; these genes encode seven non-structural proteins and three structural proteins. The RNA strand is held within a nucleocapsid formed from 12 kDa protein blocks; the capsid is contained within a host-derived membrane altered by two viral glycoproteins.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA