Psychology & Psychiatry

Destressing managers with yoga

Researchers in India have studied the effects of yoga practice on mindfulness, emotional wellbeing, and other measures of mental health among senior managers at a multinational petroleum company. Writing in the International ...

Sports medicine & Kinesiology

Q&A: Hot yoga for weight loss and overall health

A friend of mine started doing yoga a few months ago and said after two classes a week, she has become stronger and lost weight. I want to lose weight, too, and my blood pressure is high, so my friend suggested I join her ...

Health

Q&A: The health benefits of yoga

DEAR MAYO CLINIC: I have always been fairly flexible, so I have never felt compelled to include yoga in my fitness routine. Typically, I just walk and maybe do some weights for strength training. I was talking to a friend ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Study finds yoga and meditation reduce chronic pain

A mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) course was found to benefit patients with chronic pain and depression, leading to significant improvement in participant perceptions of pain, mood and functional capacity, according ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Yoga shown to improve anxiety: study

Yoga improves symptoms of generalized anxiety disorder, a condition with chronic nervousness and worry, suggesting the popular practice may be helpful in treating anxiety in some people.

Psychology & Psychiatry

The effects of yoga on student mental health

In college, young adults go through a developmental stage in which they experience many waves of success and failures. When failure is not handled properly, students may experience mental health issues, which may be difficult ...

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Yoga

Yoga (Sanskrit, Pāli: योग yóga) is a series of traditional physical and mental disciplines originating in India. The word is associated with meditative practices in Hinduism, Buddhism and Jainism. In Hinduism, it also refers to one of the six orthodox (āstika) schools of Hindu philosophy, and to the goal toward which that school directs its practices. In Jainism it refers to the sum total of all activities—mental, verbal and physical.

Major branches of yoga in Hindu philosophy include Raja Yoga, Karma Yoga, Jnana Yoga, Bhakti Yoga, and Hatha Yoga. Raja Yoga, compiled in the Yoga Sutras of Patanjali, and known simply as yoga in the context of Hindu philosophy, is part of the Samkhya tradition. Many other Hindu texts discuss aspects of yoga, including Upanishads, the Bhagavad Gita, the Hatha Yoga Pradipika, the Shiva Samhita and various Tantras.

The Sanskrit word yoga has many meanings, and is derived from the Sanskrit root yuj, meaning "to control", "to yoke" or "to unite". Translations include "joining", "uniting", "union", "conjunction", and "means". Outside India, the term yoga is typically associated with Hatha Yoga and its asanas (postures) or as a form of exercise. Someone who practices yoga or follows the yoga philosophy is called a Yogi.

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