Heart Attack

Gel implant might help fight heart failure

(HealthDay)—Injecting beads of gel into the wall of a still-beating heart has the potential to improve the health of patients with severe heart failure, according to a new study.

Nov 20, 2014
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Obesity fuels silent heart damage

Using an ultrasensitive blood test to detect the presence of a protein that heralds heart muscle injury, researchers from Johns Hopkins and elsewhere have found that obese people without overt heart disease ...

Nov 20, 2014
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Bad marriage, broken heart?

Older couples in a bad marriage—particularly female spouses—have a higher risk for heart disease than those in a good marriage, finds the first nationally representative study of its kind.

Nov 19, 2014
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Early statin use may give long-term heart benefits

Taking a cholesterol-lowering drug for five years in middle age can lower heart and death risks for decades afterward, and the benefits seem to grow over time, a landmark study of men in Scotland finds. Doctors ...

Nov 19, 2014
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Stem cells faulty in Duchenne muscular dystrophy

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Multiple allergic reactions traced to single protein

Johns Hopkins and University of Alberta researchers have identified a single protein as the root of painful and dangerous allergic reactions to a range of medications and other substances. If a new drug can ...

Despite risks, benzodiazepine use highest in older people

Prescription use of benzodiazepines—a widely used class of sedative and anti-anxiety medications—increases steadily with age, despite the known risks for older people, according to a comprehensive analysis of benzodiazepine ...