Motor Neurone Disease

Discovering how the brain ages

Researchers at Newcastle University have revealed the mechanism by which neurons, the nerve cells in the brain and other parts of the body, age. The research, published today in Aging Cell, opens up new avenues of understanding ...

Sep 12, 2012
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Toxic proteins damage nerve cells

Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Biology of Ageing in Cologne and University College London have now unearthed the way in which a specific genetic mutation leads to neuronal damage in two serious ...

Aug 12, 2014
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Brain tumour treatment hope

Australian scientists have played a key role in the identification of a new biochemical mechanism that allows brain tumours to survive and grow, offering hope of new drug treatments for some of the most aggressive ...

Oct 20, 2011
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When nerve meets muscle, biglycan seals the deal

A protein that has shown early promise in preventing the loss of muscle function in mouse models of Duchenne muscular dystrophy, has been found in a new study to be a key player in the process of joining nerves ...

Feb 14, 2012
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Mutated gene causes nerve cell death

Researchers identify new mechanism in the onset of incurable nerve disease The British astrophysicist Stephen Hawking is likely to be the world's most famous person living with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis ...

Mar 13, 2013
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The motor neurone diseases (or motor neuron diseases) (MND) are a group of neurological disorders that selectively affect motor neurones, the cells that control voluntary muscle activity including speaking, walking, breathing, swallowing and general movement of the body. They are generally progressive in nature, and can cause progressive disability and death. The drug riluzole can slow progression slightly; apart from this the medical care is supportive. The condition was first described in full by the French neurologist Jean-Martin Charcot in 1869.

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