Skin Cancer

Scientists identify promising new melanoma drug

A new drug discovered by scientists at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute (SBP) may show promise for treating skin cancers that are resistant or unresponsive to today's leading therapies.

Nov 25, 2015
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Portrazza approved for advanced lung cancer

(HealthDay)—Portrazza (necitumumab), in combination with two other chemotherapy drugs, has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat advanced squamous non-small cell lung cancer, the agency said Tuesday ...

Nov 25, 2015
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Causal link between aneuploidy and cancer

One of the key unresolved question in cancer is whether aneuploidy, as defined by the presence of gain or loss of chromosomes, is the cause or the consequence of cancer development. Since the observations by Boveri and Von ...

Nov 24, 2015
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Cotellic approved for advanced melanoma

(HealthDay)—Cotellic (cobimetinib) in combination with another chemotherapy, vemurafenib (Zelboraf) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat melanoma skin cancer that has spread or cannot be surgically ...

Nov 10, 2015
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Scratching the surface of skin disease

An international team of scientists, led by researchers from A*STAR's Genome Institute of Singapore (GIS), Institute of Medical Biology (IMB), and Bioinformatics Institute (BII), and P&G, have completed the first comprehensive ...

Nov 09, 2015
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Kidney failure and its treatment may impact cancer risk

For patients with kidney failure, poor kidney function and immunosuppressant medications may increase their risk of developing different types of cancer. The findings, which are published in a study appearing in an upcoming ...

Nov 12, 2015
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Skin neoplasms (also known as "skin cancer") are skin growths with differing causes and varying degrees of malignancy. The three most common malignant skin cancers are basal cell cancer, squamous cell cancer, and melanoma, each of which is named after the type of skin cell from which it arises. Skin cancer generally develops in the epidermis (the outermost layer of skin), so a tumor can usually be seen. This means that it is often possible to detect skin cancers at an early stage. Unlike many other cancers, including those originating in the lung, pancreas, and stomach, only a small minority of those affected will actually die of the disease, though it can be disfiguring. Melanoma survival rates are poorer than for non-melanoma skin cancer, although when melanoma is diagnosed at an early stage, treatment is easier and more people survive.

Skin cancer is the most commonly diagnosed type of cancer. Melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancers combined are more common than lung, breast, colorectal, and prostate cancer. Melanoma is less common than both basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma, but it is the most serious — for example, in the UK there were over 11,700 new cases of melanoma in 2008, and over 2,000 deaths. It is the second most common cancer in young adults aged 15–34 in the UK. Most cases are caused by over-exposure to UV rays from the sun or sunbeds. Non-melanoma skin cancers are the most common skin cancers. The majority of these are basal cell carcinomas. These are usually localized growths caused by excessive cumulative exposure to the sun and do not tend to spread.

This text uses material from Wikipedia licensed under CC BY-SA

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