Skin Cancer

Having eczema may reduce your risk of skin cancer

Eczema caused by defects in the skin could reduce the risk of developing skin cancer, according to new research by King's College London. The immune response triggered by eczema could help prevent tumour ...

May 06, 2014
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New general concept for the treatment of cancer

A team of researchers from five Swedish universities, led by Karolinska Institutet and the Science for Life Laboratory, have identified a new way of treating cancer. The concept is presented in the journal ...

Apr 02, 2014
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Low risk prostate cancer not always low risk

More and more men who believe they have low-risk prostate cancers are opting for active surveillance, forgoing treatment and monitoring the cancer closely with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) tests, digital rectal exams and ...

May 19, 2014
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Experimental drug helps body fight advanced melanoma

(HealthDay)—An experimental drug that harnesses the power of the body's immune system to fight cancer has helped some patients with advanced melanoma keep their disease in check for several years, a new ...

Mar 03, 2014
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Herpes-loaded stem cells used to kill brain tumors

(Medical Xpress)—Harvard Stem Cell Institute (HSCI) scientists at Massachusetts General Hospital have a potential solution for how to more effectively kill tumor cells using cancer-killing viruses. The ...

May 16, 2014
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Study links genetic mutation and melanoma progression

Dartmouth researchers have found that the genetic mutation BRAFV600E, frequently found in metastatic melanoma, not only secretes a protein that promotes the growth of melanoma tumor cells, but can also modify ...

Sep 11, 2014
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Latest Spotlight News

Young adults found displaying symptoms of net addiction

In 2012, Allen Frances, MD, professor emeritus and former chair of the department of psychiatry at Duke University, cautioned that "Internet Addiction" could be the next new fad diagnosis, complete with "an exuberant trumpeting by newly minted 'thought leading' researchers and clinicians." So ...